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Wanted: Chicks in the Spokane,WA area

Discussion in 'Buy Sell Auction - Archives' started by yemana, May 11, 2009.

  1. yemana

    yemana New Egg

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    May 11, 2009
    Hello,

    I am new to raising chickens and would like some advice on the best ones to get for eggs. I also am in the market to get 3 hens if anyone knows of some? Any newbie advice would be helpful too:)

    Kathlene
     
  2. idahodebra

    idahodebra Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 14, 2008
    Coeur d'Alene, Idaho
    Welcome! Have you checked out Big R on Trent? They may still have chicks. Also, Aslin-Finch by Costco and Home Depot on Sprague still had a few a couple of days ago. I see them listed on Craigslist quite a bit. Most of the ones I've seen the feed/farm stores carry are usually good layers, and suited for our climate- Barred Rocks, Buff Orps, Wyandottes, Rhode Island Reds, Red Stars, Australorps, to name a few. I also see hens listed on Craigslist. They are usually about $10-15 each, which isn't bad if you think about how much it costs to raise a chick to laying age.

    Chicks need heat, water, and food. I like to use giant rubbermaid type containers that are about $15 at Walmart. I use a clamp on heat lamp and red bulb, available at the feed/farm stores, and they also carry the feed, feeders and waterers that they need. They also need pine shavings for bedding. Don't use cedar, as the oils can kill them. You will need to feed them a special chick starter food until they get to about laying age, as they grow alot really fast and need the protein and vitamins. You can use the medicated kind for the first few weeks to help avoid sicknesses that chicks are particularly prone to. They need to have heat at about 90 degrees the first week, then decreased 5 degrees every week, until they are fully feathered or it's warm enough. I usually place the heat lamp low in one end of the brooder, so that the chicks can come and go as they need heat or not. If they are all huddled under the lamp, they are usually to cool. If they are kind of spread out around the sides of lamp, it's usually just right. You want happy, active chicks who make lots of cute little peeps and trills. If they are particularly loud, it usually means that they are unhappy about something. Usually too cold, or out of water/food.

    Feel free to ask any questions you may have. This place is great [​IMG]


    Debra
     
  3. yemana

    yemana New Egg

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    May 11, 2009
    Debra,

    Thanks so much! I was wondering if it is ok to use hay as bedding? I can get that for free, but if it is not as good then I won't use it.

    I also had some questions about my coup. I live in town,do I need it to have a roof or wire covering on top? I was under the impression that chickens don't fly much? The fencing around it is 6' tall.

    I called Aslin Finch and they were out, but they are getting some Golden somethings in 2 weeks.

    Anybody who answers is ok [​IMG]

    I am new and need some help!
    Kathlene
     
  4. idahodebra

    idahodebra Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 14, 2008
    Coeur d'Alene, Idaho
    Hay is an okay bedding, and free is always good. For chicks, the shavings are probably better, and one bag will last a really long time.

    Your coop should have four walls and a roof to protect from the weather and nighttime predators. They need to be shut in at night for there safety. They can't see in the dark and are totally vulnerable. You can make the decision to let them wander around unrestricted, or "free-range", during the daytime. This has many benefits, as they can hunt and forage for much of there diet, provide insect and pest control, and give eggs high in omega-3's. The disadvantages would be that they are vulnerable to any predators that may be around in the day, including neighborhood cats and dogs, and hawks. Raccoons and coyotes are also a big issue in many areas in Spokane. If your neighborhood has an issue with cats disappearing, I would be very careful with chickens. An option to give them the benefits of free-range, but offer them protection, is to use a moveable chicken tractor system. If you have an attached chicken run on your coop, then I would put something on the top. Bird netting should be fine, and would help the birds in, and hawks out. Chickens don't fly much, but they can, especially if startled. They don't fly long distances, but can go up and over a 6 foot fence.

    Aslin-Finch probably has gold sex-links coming in, which are good egg layers. Did you try Big R? They aren't far from Aslin-Finch, and may have a bigger selection. I'm sure there are other farm/feed stores in Spokane, but those are the 2 that I drive over for. I have an Aslin-Finch in my area, but I'd rather shop at the new Valley store. I also love Big R, and they have good service, too. Check Craiglist. Someone was listing Auracauna chicks for a $1 in Post Falls today. They lay colored eggs. I think I need some, lol.

    Debra
     

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