Was it really Cocci or just stress?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by egyptchick, Oct 19, 2011.

  1. egyptchick

    egyptchick Out Of The Brooder

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    May 4, 2011
    Ontario
    I have 8 chicks and a broody hen that developed bloody poop about 6 days ago. 4 of the chicks are 4-5 week old silkies and the other are 4 banties with their momma. They were in the same space but seperated by wire. The temp coop was ourside, uninsulated and with a small heat lamp would stay at 14-18 degrees. unfortunately temps dropped and that is when they developed the bloody poop. The 4 chicks with the momma were hunched over and puffed up but were still active, ate and drank well. the 4 silkies had bloody poop but no other sign of problems. Could this be cocci?

    I tried to find Sulmet or Amphrolium but no success other then medicated chick starter. Since bringing them into the house where it stays about 20 degrees, the bloody poop disappeared (within 12 hours), they are all active with no hunching over and are all eating well. Were they just stressed out? Should I order meds online and give it to them anyway?

    Also, I was looking for new homes for the chicks before this happened but put that on hold until they are symptom free. How long should I wait after they are symptom free? I really don't have the space for these chicks to remain in my house so I need to get them new homes but I don't want to contaminate someone elses flock.
     
  2. egyptchick

    egyptchick Out Of The Brooder

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    0
    32
    May 4, 2011
    Ontario
    I am not sure if this is significant or not but the broody hen layed an egg today that looked normal. First one. Would this mean she is okay?
     
  3. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    It does sound like coccidiosis to me. Now whether you want to treat now that the signs of it have gone is up to you, but if it were me I would do the treatment. The reason is that there could be additional damage being done silently, as is what happens before the bloody poo is visible.

    Additionally, there is not always bloody poo visible. I wouldn't want the chickens to struggle with it if they were mine.

    I would treat them before selling them, myself. Usually this is a disease that strikes those 8 weeks and under. But adults can and do get cocci, especially if immunocompromised.

    Have you checked the cattle section of the feed store for amprolium? You can sometimes find the powder also there.

    Just my opinion!!!

    I have had to retreat with Corid on two occasions, a few days (less than a week) after giving it the first time. So I guess I would venture that from my experience a week is sufficient after treatment. That would be a judgement call. (I am referring to your question of when to sell them.)

    Also, I am assuming that by bloody poo you are not referring to "shed intestinal lining" which also appears red in the poo.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2011

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