Was told new Buff Orps were laying,how long until settled and laying again?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by JacksFarmNGardn, Dec 27, 2015.

  1. JacksFarmNGardn

    JacksFarmNGardn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've only owned my 2 Buff Orps for a week and a half. I was told when I got them,that all the hens were layers. There were hens that ranged from 7 months to 1 1/2 yrs old, and judging by their combs,seem to be 1 1/2. Now,i'm not in a hurry for eggs right now, they have been treated and can't eat the eggs anyways.I'd hope by spring they would be settled and start up again. I'm still curious though,based on experiences,how long after introducing new hens,do they lay? They aren't molting,and one has a really red comb.
     
  2. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    It could be just a few weeks, or it could take months. It just depends on the individual birds.
     
  3. JacksFarmNGardn

    JacksFarmNGardn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks [​IMG]
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    [​IMG]

    What were they treated for that you can't eat the eggs? I'd be more concerned about that condition inhibiting egg laying, if they were ill or parasite infested.
     
  5. JacksFarmNGardn

    JacksFarmNGardn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They were just treated for prevention! Not parasite infestation. I treated them with Ivermectin. You're just not supposed to eat the eggs for about 3 wks,which don't matter in my case if they're not laying anyways.
     
  6. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    I recently acquired a Buff Orpington hen, and have had her a little over a week. She was the lone survivor of her flock after her owner abandoned them. At the rescue shelter, they treated her with Ivermectin as a precaution even though they didn't see signs of worms. I'm happy they did.

    She isn't laying, and I believe it's partly due to her trauma of being nearly starved to death. But the short days are probably going to prevent her from laying for another month or so. If you live in the norther hemisphere, your hens are probably also affected by the short supply of daylight right now.

    Some time after January, we both may see eggs from these new girls.
     
  7. JacksFarmNGardn

    JacksFarmNGardn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aww,poor thing! Glad to hear she is with you! I'm sure she'll have a great life! And yes,i'm Northern Hemisphere, east coast US. Our days will now be getting longer! I can't wait til spring.Good luck with your new girl!
     

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