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Washing Eggs

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by samanthaburns, Aug 9, 2013.

  1. samanthaburns

    samanthaburns Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 7, 2013
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    My husband read somewhere that it is not safe to wash eggs. He said the change of temperature causes bacteria to grow inside the eggs. Is this true ?
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Not quite accurate.

    Each state Ag Extension office publishes an egg handling guideline. They're all over the web. In a nutshell, if you choose to wash the eggs (not everyone does) then be sure the eggs are washed in water 20-30F warmer than the egg. It's really more of a sanitizing. They don't "soak" for a long time or anything.

    Your husbands's concern is true is you rinse/wash in cold water. All the commercial eggs, even the free range or organic eggs sold in the finest markets must all be washed. No exceptions. They do it safely and it is required. Just sayin'.
     
  3. samanthaburns

    samanthaburns Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 7, 2013
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    I don't wash off the chicken eggs but I do the duck eggs. They have dirt and such on them. Just a quick rinse is all
     
  4. goldencomets6

    goldencomets6 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 25, 2012
    I always wipe mine off with a damp warm paper towel if they are dirty. I've never had any issues doing it that way
     
  5. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Lots of folks do not wash eggs at all. That's a popular, natural position taken by many on BYC.

    But, But... If you do choose to wash eggs, following one of the many, many safe egg handling phamplets printed and posted on line should be employed. As I said, every state has published one these guidelines. They are almost all the same in content. Quick little one page brochures.


    http://dnr.alaska.gov/ag/Inspection/LPM00344.pdf

    http://www.mass.gov/eea/docs/agr/animal-health/poultry/safe-egg-handling-for-backyard-egg-producers.pdf

    http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/food/food_safety/handling/hgic3507.html


    And many, many more, as many as there are states and state Ag Universities, I suppose.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2013
  6. LadyLucia

    LadyLucia Out Of The Brooder

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  7. WalkingOnSunshine

    WalkingOnSunshine Overrun With Chickens

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    Ohio
    x2

    When you wash in water that's warmer than the egg, it actually causes some of the air inside the egg to move out through the pores, carrying bacteria with it. If you wash in colder water, you can force bacteria into the egg.

    We sell eggs, and are required to wash ours in an "approved egg wash" and warm water.
     

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