Watery Eyes, Runny Nose, Standing IN Water!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by MamaDragon, Oct 7, 2008.

  1. MamaDragon

    MamaDragon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 4, 2008
    Camden, AR
    Hi All!

    I've got two Cockerals, and one hen all with clear watery eyes, one eye on each bird has matted closed, no eye drainage. Clear fluid from one's nostrils. No coughing, sneezing so far. Wattles on only one roo is hot to the touch.

    Edit to Add: I just caught the other two - there is some facial swelling on the right side, beginning of POSSIBLE gasping from being chased and caught, and all three have the right eye affected.

    This morning, the RIR cockeral was standing IN the watering pan. (fever?)

    I've got no way to isolate three chickens (only one dog travel cage, will hold two if pushed, but not all three, and the roos already fight each other). [​IMG]

    The hen was aquired from a local breeder on 9/21; the cockerals on 9/28 from same breeder.

    None of our "original flock" appear to be infected. Does this make them the probable carriers of whatever it is? These birds came from a neighbor who's kept chickens for years, and we've swapped birds back and forth since last May. They're all McMurray birds.

    Or did the "New Birds" bring it with them? any way to tell?

    How is this going to affect the 10-day-old chicks who will be joining the flock next month?

    Am I going to have to "cull" the entire flock and start over?? [​IMG]

    [I don't want to have to tell my 10 yr old that his birds are sick, and need to be put down]

    Kathy
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2008
  2. MamaDragon

    MamaDragon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 4, 2008
    Camden, AR
    BTW - how does this affect the 4 10-week-old birds I just sold a couple days ago? They were all in the same coop, sectioned off with chicken-wire, but shared same areas at different times??
     
  3. MamaDragon

    MamaDragon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 4, 2008
    Camden, AR
    Doesn't anybody have ANY IDEAS??

    Thanks
     
  4. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    I personally would cull the roosters. With respiratory diseases, they often leave the infected bird as a carrier, and your whole flock would be sick. I cant cull my chickens, so when one of my hens had a swollen eye, and didnt look right, I had somebody do it for me.
     
  5. MamaDragon

    MamaDragon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 4, 2008
    Camden, AR
    Please excuse the Newbie Questions, BUT-

    Are you saying to cull ALL the birds affected? Without being sure such an action is necessary? In all that I've read today, nothing states that this is fatal.

    Even more importantly, since all three birds came from a local source, but didn't become sick until they had been in residence here, for 1 - 2 weeks, does that make my Original Flock carriers? Otherwise, I've got no earthly idea HOW they got infected!!

    How does watery eyes and runny nose equate to "respiratory disease"? It sounds more like a sinus infection. If it IS a simple infection, isn't that treatable with antibiotics and disinfecting the coop? I believe I've read on Here, about people treating such conditions.

    Did I read correctly, that Oxine IS effective against viral, bacterial and fungal conditions within chicken populations?

    I understand that Infectious Coryza is a likely canidate for the difficulty. So is Vitamin A deficiency. How do I tell the difference?? IF IC usually hits within 3 days (it says), why has it taken so much longer to hit?

    That's WHY I'm asking for assistance! I know how to do the research, I DONT KNOW how each illness would present - or how to go about making sure I'm making the correct diagnosis BEFORE I KILL My Son's Entire Flock.

    I really need some help here folks!!

    Kathy

    From Mississippi State University website-

    Infectious Coryza

    Infectious coryza is a specific respiratory disease in chickens that occurs most often in semi-mature or adult birds. Infection may result in a slow-spreading, chronic disease that affects only a small number of birds at one time, or in a rapid spreading disease with a higher percentage of birds being affected. The occurrence of infectious coryza is not widespread and the incidence is relatively low.

    The disease is caused by a bacterium known as Hemophilus gallinarum. Outbreaks usually result from the introduction of infected or carrier birds into a flock. Transmission of the infection occurs by direct contact, airborne infection by dust or respiratory discharge droplets and drinking water contaminated by infective nasal exudate. Susceptible birds usually develop symptoms within three days after exposure to the disease. Recovered individuals may appear normal but remain carriers of the organism for long periods. Once a flock is infected, all birds must be considered as carriers.

    The most characteristic symptoms of infectious coryza include edematous swelling of the face around the eyes and wattles, nasal discharge and swollen sinuses. Watery discharge from the eyes frequently results in the lids adhering together. Vision may be affected because of the swelling. The disease results in a decrease in feed and water consumption and an increase in the number of cull birds. An adverse effect on egg production usually occurs in proportion to the number of affected birds.

    Diagnosis can be confirmed only by isolation and identification of the causative organism. The organism, Hemophilus gallinarum, is extremely fastidious and often difficult to isolate.

    Prevention is the only sound approach in controlling infectious coryza. It usually can be prevented by management programs that eliminate contact between susceptible and infected birds. It requires only separating affected or carrier birds from the susceptible population. In order to prevent the infection, introduce started or adult birds only from sources known to be free of the infection. If infection occurs, complete depopulation followed by thorough cleaning/disinfecting is the only means for eliminating the disease.

    A number of drugs are effective for treating the symptoms of the disease although the disease is never completely eliminated. Sulfadimethoxine or sulfathiazole in the feed or water or erythromycin administered in the drinking water can reduce the symptoms of this disease.
     

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