ways to become self sufficient

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by quadcam79, Jan 27, 2008.

  1. quadcam79

    quadcam79 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 28, 2007
    Fernandina Beach Fl.
    As requested....ways of becoming self sufficient:
    if you own chickens then you have already started on the path to self sufficiency. If not, it's never too late to stop relying on others to supply your household.

    The first thing you can do is start a veggie garden...you dont need alot of room to start a garden, The square-foot gardening concept is simple: Build a raised bed, divide the space into sections of one square-foot each, and then plant vegetables (and/or flowers) in just the amount of space they need. The advantages of this system include reduced workload, less watering, easy weeding (and not much of it), and easy access to your crops. This is a great way to learn to grow some of your own food.

    http://www.squarefootgardening.com/

    another simple thing that will also help your garden, composting...you can compost a large majority of things that you would normally just toss in the trash or send down the garbage disposal.

    All organic matter eventually decomposes. Composting speeds the process by providing an ideal environment for bacteria and other decomposing microorganisms. The final product, humus or compost, looks and feels like fertile garden soil. This dark, crumbly, earthy-smelling stuff works wonders on all kinds of soil and provides vital nutrients to help plants grow and look better.
    heres a list of 163 things that can go into the compost bin
    http://www.plantea.com/compost-materials.htm

    compost bins can be made from anything from rubbermaid type containers , chicken wire, pallets to premade tumblers
    you can even add redworms to the mix. Worm composting is using worms to recycle food scraps and other organic material into a valuable soil amendment called vermicompost, or worm compost. Worms eat food scraps, which become compost as they pass through the worm's body. Compost exits the worm through its' tail end. This compost can then be used to grow plants.
    how to build a simple worm compost bin
    http://whatcom.wsu.edu/ag/compost/Easywormbin.htm

    thats just the beginning....theres a ton of ways you can become more self sufficient . i also have a forum you can visit and register on, it's all about self sufficiency, aquaponics 9hydroponics +aquaculture), solar, wind, water and more..
    http://www.freakvillepcs.com/technofarming

    feel free to add your own tips to this post
     
  2. Stormhorse23

    Stormhorse23 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 22, 2007
    Indiana
    thats pretty neat quadcam
     
  3. quadcam79

    quadcam79 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 28, 2007
    Fernandina Beach Fl.
    thanks... i'll have some more here in a little while
     
  4. quadcam79

    quadcam79 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 28, 2007
    Fernandina Beach Fl.
    already have a garden and compost bin you say? ok take a step up and build an aquaponic garden. Aquaponics is the marriage of hydroponics (growing plants without soil) and aquaculture (growing fish for food)

    How does it work? Plants remove nutrients from the water. These nutrients – generated from fish manure, algae, and decomposing fish feed – are contaminants that would otherwise build up to toxic levels in the fish tanks, but instead serve as liquid fertilizer to hydroponically grown plants. In turn, the hydroponic beds function as a biofilter – stripping off ammonia, nitrates, nitrites, and phosphorus – so the freshly cleansed water can then be recirculated back into the fish tanks. The nitrifying bacteria living in the gravel and in association with the plant roots play a critical role in nutrient cycling; without these microorganisms the whole system would stop functioning.

    so to simplify, the fish water is pumped into plant growbeds the plants feed off the fish waste and filter the water which is pumped back into the fish tank, a complete closed bio system.

    the growbed can be as simple as a large rubbermaid type container filled with gravel. the fish can be grown in any waterproof container that will hold whichever type of fish you want to keep. start with goldfish if you like.

    Plants for aquaponics systems: Lettuce, herbs, and specialty greens (spinach, chives, basil, and watercress) have low to medium nutritional requirements and are well adapted to aquaponic systems. Plants yielding fruit (tomatoes, bell peppers, and cucumbers) have a higher nutritional demand and perform better in a heavily stocked, well established aquaponic system

    plant growth in an AP system is amazing. growth rates are about 1/4 to 1/2 the normal time and twice the size.
    more info on my site in the first post
     
  5. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    Quote:Now this one is new to me. Very cool. Too bad the ground is frozen or I'd be out
    digging a pond.

    Any ideas what type of fish would be best suited for this. I'm thinkin catfish. Yum.
     
  6. quadcam79

    quadcam79 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 28, 2007
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    instead of a pond you can get one of those 200-300 gallon rubbermaid troughs and put it in a greenhouse, garage etc...

    as far as fish I want tilapia, right up there with catfish. You can use any kind of fish. several warm-water and cold-water fish species are adapted to AP systems, including tilapia, trout, perch, Arctic char, and bass. However, most commercial aquaponic systems in North America are based on tilapia.

    Tilapia is a warm-water species that grows well in a recirculating tank culture. Furthermore, tilapia is tolerant of fluctuating water conditions such as pH, temperature, oxygen, and dissolved solids. Tilapia produces a white-fleshed meat suitable to local and wholesale markets.

    catfish would work just as well, my stsem is going to have Tilapia, freshwater prawn and crayfish in 3 separate tanks. just think about this...in one complete self sustaining system you can grow an entire meal all organic

    check out the growth in one of these systems..
    http://freakvillepcs.com/technofarming/viewtopic.php?t=24
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2008
  7. quadcam79

    quadcam79 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 28, 2007
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    more tips for us tightwad, Homesteading, tree-hugging, dirt worshipping, too-liberal-to-be-conservative-too-conservative-to-be-a-liberal, frugal, simple living, hippy-but-college-educated, peace-love-and-rock 'n' roll, animal loving, pro-choice, pro-gun, anti-war, support our troops, activist types....

    ... self sufficient and frugal seem to go together.

    Dont buy Instant Oatmeal, make your own, it's simple
    use a large canister and dump in a large package of quick oats, toss in about 1 cup of milk powder and 1/2 to 1 cup brown sugar. Put the lid on and shake the canister to mix everything, then put in a 1 cup measuring cup. Now you can either separate it into individual baggies or just leave it in one and everyone adds their own goodies like raisins or fruit or whatever.

    Dont buy expensive laundry stain remover, a few drops of $.99 shampoo takes out everything

    speaking of shampoo, buy the gallon size at the beauty supply store $6.99 and it'll last for months

    when you have your garden growing well you're grocery bill will be about 50% less, during that time you can buy meat in bulk, cut it down, vacuum seal it and freeze it for winter

    make a pricebook, A grocery price book is an ongoing list of the items you most commonly purchase and how much you paid for them. This list allows you to detect price cycles, spot bargains, and plan your shopping trips for maximum savings.
    http://www.stretcher.com/stories/05/05mar14c.cfm

    make your own pickles with cucumbers from your garden. you did remember to plant cukes right?
    http://www.pickyourown.org/makingpickles.htm

    plant fruit trees, it'll payoff in no time. plus you can use the fruit for jellies, pies, dehydrated or added to that homemade instant oatmeal you made
    dont start the tree from seed unless you have about 15 yrs to wait for fruit, you can buy decent sized trees at places like lowes for $20 or start the tree from a cutting off an established tree.

    save the eyes from your potatoes and the root of your onions and plant them.

    shop CVS, i cant even explain this one...heres a site http://www.moneysavingmom.com/2007/09/cvs-101.html

    if
    you have to buy a backpack, buy a Jansport, they have a lifetime warranty, if it comes apart or anything They ask you to wash it and pay the shipping to Washington, they repair/replace it and send it back. Fast and Easy

    I also drink alot of Mt dew so i always have 2 liter bottles sitting around, I cut them in 1/2 and use the bottom part to start seeds for the garden, the top half makes a handy funnel
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2008
  8. Wildsky

    Wildsky Wild Egg!

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    Oct 13, 2007
    California
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2008
  9. Southern28Chick

    Southern28Chick Flew The Coop

    Apr 16, 2007
    Quadcam,

    I PMed you back. [​IMG]
     
  10. PurpleChicken

    PurpleChicken Tolerated.....Mostly

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    I'm glad you restarted this thread but now you have my brain in overload.

    I thought Tilapia were salt water fish????
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2008

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