Ways to cook up old Roos

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Redhead Hen, May 2, 2009.

  1. Redhead Hen

    Redhead Hen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 14, 2009
    Rising Sun, Maryland
    We are having our old RIR roos butchered today. They are old but pretty heavy and large. I am asking y'all for some good ways to cook em up so they are not tough. I have heard that they will be tough since they are older. We are putting them in the freezer for a little while first as I have already planned the meals for the week. The Amish laday - where my husband is taking the roos to be butchered - told him to soak (and thaw since it will be frozen) the chicken in salt water before cooking.

    Basically, I have never dealt with this kind of cooking before as all the chicken I cook comes from the store! [​IMG] And I do want to have an idea of what I can make with these chickens since I am aware that they will be tough. So please send me some ideas! (I don't have a pressure cooker, so recipe ideas without one is appreciated!)

    Thanks![​IMG]
     
  2. Boyd

    Boyd Recipient of The Biff Twang

    Mar 14, 2009
    MI
    Crockpot Chicken Noodle soup!!!!!!!!!! Chicken Pot Pies, um..... oh yeah!!!!!!!!!!!! I almost forgot my favorite... beer butt chicken on the grill.... and if you don't like the flavor of beer, use half a can of sprite instead!
     
  3. Redhead Hen

    Redhead Hen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 14, 2009
    Rising Sun, Maryland
    Great ideas! And beer is not a problem with me! [​IMG] Is there any special prep before cooking I should do? Or just thaw it and cook it slow? Should I thaw it out in salt water like the Amish woman suggested?[​IMG]
     
  4. Opa

    Opa Opa-wan Chickenobi

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    May 11, 2008
    Howell Michigan
    Brining poultry definitely makes any bird taste better, especially old tough birds. They are great for chicken and dumplings if you pressure cook them first.
     
  5. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

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    Mar 12, 2008
    Loxahatchee, Florida
    I thought you were supposed to let the birds rest in the refrigerator for 1-3 days before cooking or freezing. Some people have them rest in brine, or buttermilk, or wait & soak them before cooking.

    I read a great article in an old Backyard Poultry magazine I recently unearthed from my desk, from the June/July 2006 issue titled "Tradition-Rich Chicken Soup". The author talks about how older birds have the best flavor for making soups & stews, and describes how to best prepare them. I don't know if there's a way to access their archives online. If not, perhaps I could fax it to you.

    She describes a process similar to how I prepare the birds I butcher. Since I do standard and mixed-breed roos I let them grow until about 20 weeks so they'll be nice & meaty. Instead of roasting them whole, I slowly simmer them for a few hours until the meat slides right off the bones, then I pick out the bones & freeze the meat in packets. That way I have cooked tender meat ready for use whenever I need it.
     
  6. Chicks_N_Horses

    Chicks_N_Horses Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2009
    South Alabama
    Quote:This is a good method! The meat is really good this way, to me. I do most of ours this way.
     
  7. bethandjoeync

    bethandjoeync Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 21, 2009
    Iron Station, NC
    brining is the key. it will help tenderize the meat and the meat will soak the water in because of the salt in the water. you will never dry it out, believe me I do this with my T-day Turkey every year. water, at least a cup of salt, and herbs if you like. let it soak for 4-6 hours turning it over mid way (from breast down to breast up). it will be noticiably heavier and plump. once done brining rinse well and cook as you like. also from what I understand, freezing meat helps break down the muscle tissue as well, so that should help
     
  8. Chicks_N_Horses

    Chicks_N_Horses Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 30, 2009
    South Alabama
    Not to hi-jack the thread here but I have a question...



    I have never brined so I would think that soaking meat in salt water would make it taste salty...??? Does it?

    I usually never use salt when I cook so that is why I haven't tried brining the meat but it sounds interesting, I think I might try it.
     
  9. Redhead Hen

    Redhead Hen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 14, 2009
    Rising Sun, Maryland
    I have heard of brinning(sp?) before and from what I understand the salt really does not stand out. Especially in my case with chicken that is a few years old! Also, if you brine while thawing, it should really cut down on the toughness of the meat. Flavoring would come in during the cooking process. I would assume that whatever seasonings you use during cooking would be what you taste not the salt from brinning(sp?).


    I do like the idea of cooking it until the meat falls off the bones though! Then I could pretty much use it in anything![​IMG]


    PS~ I'm not a great speller, so please excuse my spelling! [​IMG];)
     
  10. Opa

    Opa Opa-wan Chickenobi

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    Howell Michigan
    I brine almost all of my birds and have never tasted salt. If you want a real treat, try brining (12 hrs) and then slow smoke cooking (12 hrs). I normally do about 6 dozen birds a year this way and every one loves them. Very moist, very favorful, and very tender.
     

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