Wazine for chickens

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by LynetteBme, Nov 9, 2013.

  1. LynetteBme

    LynetteBme Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 25, 2013
    For round worms-The label said 60 ml for 100 chickens. Using a math equation (If 30 ml for 100 then x ml for 12 chickens) "x" came out to be 7.2 ml. I've read that some say they use 30 ml no matter how many chickens. Not a math wiz, here. Don't want to under or over medicate. Advice?
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2013
  2. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Piperazine has proven to be less effective on roundworms due to resistance from years of use. With 12 chickens, it should be easy enough to use Valbazen suspension, a broad spectrum wormer containing albendazole which removes all types of worms. Dose them at night while they're roosting and calm. Oral dosage is 1/2 cc for standards and 1/4 cc for bantams via syringe with out a needle. Worm once and again 10 days later. Supposed 2 week withdrawal from last dose. According to the IHC (maintained by Merck) you could also use Safe guard liquid suspension, if tapeworms are not a concern, by using the same dosage as Valbazen. There is no withdrawal from Safe guard: https://www.ihc-poultry.com/page/product-SafeGuard/159
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2013
  3. LynetteBme

    LynetteBme Out Of The Brooder

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    I have the Wazine from the farm supply store where my husband works. I'll have to try and find the other. Also, I am going to clean and bleach my hen house, change out the wood shavings, etc. Is there anything else I need to do? What about the dirt in the pen? I've had chickens for years and never had a problem. I've been very protective. I keep my hens in a covered pen (to protect them from varmints) as we live in the woods.This past summer, our neighbor said a stray chicken showed up on his place and was devastating his garden so he brought the hen to me. I was unwise, I think, and allowed her to join my flock. I am now dealing with things I've never dealt with.
     
  4. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Parasites are in the environment, period. There is no getting rid of them. Depending on the type of worm they use various hosts in the form of insects, earth worms and wild birds. The key is management, not environmental eradication. Simply deworming your flock a couple times a year will manage the worm loads they carry and prevent the parasites from damaging the health of your birds.

    I highly recommend using Valbazen as suggested, Wazine is nearly worthless as a wormer.
     
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  5. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Cafarmgirl makes a good point with worms being in the environment. That's nature. Worm eggs are passed in droppings from infected birds. earthworms, beetles, slugs and snails. But a dry environment in the coop will prevent the numbers from rising. Climates vary across the nation, and folks in the South may worm more frequently than those in the North. I'm in Northern California, and have found that twice a year prevents problems from occurring. I have lots of wild quail, crows, vultures, and even wild turkey throughout the year visiting my property.

    1" chicken wire over your yard helps prevent wild birds from visiting your trough feeders and waterers in the yard. On range, you take chances. Cleaning feeders and waterers daily is beneficial to your chickens too. In regard to coop cleanliness, I clean out my coops 3-4 times a year. That means removal of litter, vacuuming of dust, sanitizing with Oxine AH, and treating with emulsified concentrates of permethrin or rabon-vapona based insecticides. These methods have been beneficial through my observation of more than 30 years of keeping chickens. I have experimented with trails of numerous products, organic and synthesized , and would only recommend what I've seen be effective without compromising the health of the flock.

    Of course, diet and genetics have much to do with the health of your flock in order for birds to have a strong immune system, so they can't be raised in a completely sterile environment. The main thing is helping them adjust to your particular environment from a chick to an adult with balanced nutrients. That's a subject requiring many details, and will become common sense over time.
     
  6. LynetteBme

    LynetteBme Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for everyone's input. So I've have had such a healthy flock until now, I'm deal with things I've never had to worry about. I appreciate everyone wisdom and experience. :)
     

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