We want to make sure we start right now

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Momagain1, May 13, 2011.

  1. Momagain1

    Momagain1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 13, 2011
    Central IL
    to make sure our roo knows he is not dominant over us.

    NO; he is not aggressive, he just runs from us...and SUPER FAST...
    I've tried to walk him back but he is sooo flipping fast he darts to the other side of the run and then
    we end up falling in the stupid sand!

    my son can catch him pretty darn well and holds him and walks around w/him and tries to get
    his trust and can occasionally hand feed him...

    but my Roo does get the girls worked up when anyone comes near; because he runs back into the coop..then they follow squawking..


    I want to change this behavior now; due to reading on here about the Roo's skittishness can turn into aggressiveness..

    mind you; he's not quite 12 wks old...I'd like to take care of it now..

    I'd like to have simple ideas to start with..leaving the more intensive ones to do if need be...

    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. stormylady

    stormylady Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 27, 2008
    Illinois
    My roos are all Gentle, might be the breed but anyway Ive only had one even protective over his hen when (I) held them,it was a diffent story when it came to other Roos or preditors he was very good. My poor baby boy Honeycomb, I miss him dearly, but anyway one day I was picking up and holding the new younger pullets and she screamed and he got upset and was jumping up in front of me trying to make me let her go, he wasn't pecking at me or anything but thought that was close enough to aggression for me so I immediately put down his girl and snagged him up and held him upside down for a minute or so then set him upright and held him for about 15 mins or so and cuddled him (I think I hurt his pride alittle) but he never did it again. And you should in my opinion start early on the training, however if they are not friendly they should be at least respectful of you and your family and run from you or at least keep a healthy distance.
     
  3. mrszlopez

    mrszlopez Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 4, 2009
    Jackson,NJ
    Maybe get a hold of the girls & try to "show" him that you guys arent the enemies. I would also say that catching him & holding him, walking around with him, etc.. might help too. if you keep the repetition going of showing him every day or every other day that youre nice, he might start to understand. Treats dont hurt either [​IMG]
     
  4. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    May 8, 2007
    Wisconsin
    It's kind of hard to have him not see you as a threat, when you're constantly chasing after him and grabbing him. I understand why you want to do that, but at the moment, it's having the opposite effect. People that do that with their pullets can have the same problem. Birds are sensitive to being chased and grabbed, just like other prey animals.

    If you want him to not see you as a threat, then you should give the chickens treats, while moving slowly and talking gently to them. He's right to see you as a threat the way things are now and the other chickens are right to follow him to safety when he's alarmed. That's the way adult flocks work.

    I know that roosters need to have respect for people. You might want to not act so aggressively with him, while you are still trying to build a relationship with him. He's not an adult and is going to be more easily frightened.
     
  5. poodlepill

    poodlepill Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 27, 2010
    Southern Illinois
    Quote:I like your avatar picture......funny "comb"
     
  6. Momagain1

    Momagain1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 13, 2011
    Central IL
    I never said we were "constantly chasing after him and grabbing him"...

    I said my son can get him pretty good...and I said I've tried walking him back...

    now that being said..he's left alone 75% of the time...if not more...
    the girls come to us (probably about 75% of them so far) for treats and dont run off when we
    are near them...but if he decides to flip out..then they all run in their coop after him...

    he wont come near us for treats...he waits for us to put it down ...and walk away then he'll get them..
    but when my son does get ahold of him, he occasionally will hand/beak eat...
     
  7. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    May 8, 2007
    Wisconsin
    I'm sorry, by the way you wrote the first part of your post, it sounded to me like you were chasing him, to catch him. If you mean that you are only chasing him occasionally to catch him, then I would still stop doing that and see if he starts to trust you more.

    There are times when a bird or a dog is being more assertive or aggressive with a person and the person acts more assertively or aggressively to back it down. There are other times when a bird or a dog is not acting aggressively and using aggressive behaviors can cause aggressive behaviors in them. It can also cause fear behaviors and damage their trust in you.
     
  8. mrszlopez

    mrszlopez Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 4, 2009
    Jackson,NJ
    Quote:I like your avatar picture......funny "comb"

    why thank you [​IMG]

    As for Momagain1 , if i were you i would try every option to get him friendly. Hopefully for both of your sakes, he comes around and begins to trust you. [​IMG]
     

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