weanling foal "over" at the fetlocks

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by loiseee, Oct 30, 2011.

  1. loiseee

    loiseee Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 7, 2011
    mena, arkansas
    Good morning,

    I am in need of some advice for a foal that is over on the rear ankles(fetlocks) In all the 40 plus years I have had horses, this is the first time it has ever happened. I have taken away all her grain, just getting grass hay, but she looks horrible, is there anything else I should be doing for her? should I give her bute? and how long should it take to get her back to normal?

    Thanks

    Loiseee
     
  2. lockedhearts

    lockedhearts It's All About Chicken Math

    Apr 29, 2007
    Georgia
    Google "Equine Leg Magic" then take some pics (from several angles) and email Kay . Give her history and send pics. This supplement is not expensive and is awesome! I have seen it correct lots of different leg issues in foals and older horses. I personally had a 2 year old I got with a fractured stifle, put him on complete stall rest and this (no bute , nothing else) he had 2 OCD lesions, after 6 months lesions were gone and he was 100% sound.

    People will give you all kinds of opinions, Kay is in her 70's , she developed this, has been a Horse Woman all her life and is a Phd and worked at the University of Florida.

    I keep this on hand at all times and would not raise babies without it.
     
  3. loiseee

    loiseee Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 7, 2011
    mena, arkansas
    Thank you very much, will do that here shortly. I know it is my fault, she got to much grain.
    I tried to take a peek at your horses, but all I got was the dreaded red x's. I have a CL Buckley son, Stretch N Catch.


    again, thank you

    Lois
     
  4. zzGypsy

    zzGypsy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 8, 2011
    I had one colt do this - he wasn't on any grain, but on really good rich 50% alfalfa hay. vet had us back him down to a lower quality all-grass hay, and the problem did correct. I'd say it took a couple of months to sort out, but I don't remember the exact time. basically it's a growth rate problem, and they do have to grow for the joints to correct, just more slowly, so it's not instantaneous. by slowing their growth rate, things will adjust, but it does take a little time. our vet suggested that we hold him at a leaner weight while finishing his growth than I typically do to prevent a reoccurance. that did work to prevent new issues.
     
  5. welsummerchicks

    welsummerchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 26, 2010
    Remove all grain and rich hays and keep her off any pasture that is not 100% grass - no clover, alfalfa.

    It will take some months to right itself.

    Supplements are not recommended. The diet must be corrected.
     
  6. lockedhearts

    lockedhearts It's All About Chicken Math

    Apr 29, 2007
    Georgia
    Quote:I beg to differ with you, but the ELM has been tested and tested with great results. If you think this is erroneous information, email Kay Kelly and tell her so([email protected]), I trust her completely and Show Halter and Pleasure horses and I have seen this correct ephystisitis and other conditions, while feeding grain and hay. I was offering an option (one that I can vouch for) to the OP. Also, this is why I told the OP that they will receive many different opinions.
     
  7. lockedhearts

    lockedhearts It's All About Chicken Math

    Apr 29, 2007
    Georgia
    Quote:I will have to change my website addy, I just moved it. Trying to update it.
     
  8. welsummerchicks

    welsummerchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 26, 2010
    Veterinarians McKeenan etc in their article on contracted tendons specifically say that the owner can provide a mineral supplement, but the ration must also be restricted at the same time, or the growth will not be corrected. They also say that the foal needs immediate veterinary attention and describe the type of exercise and wraps/splints the foal needs.

    Please, , if your foal is developing contracted tendons, restrict his diet. I have gone over the ingredients of the supplement mentioned - it alone will not correct contracted tendons where the diet is the culprit, which is what the OP specifically stated. The diet must be restricted.
     
  9. lockedhearts

    lockedhearts It's All About Chicken Math

    Apr 29, 2007
    Georgia
    Quote:Which is WHY I directed the OP to email Kay and discuss with her.......... I have known Kay to consult the University vets for some of her customers. I and many others trust her and highly value her opinion.
     
  10. welsummerchicks

    welsummerchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 26, 2010
    Anyone who tells someone to keep feeding a foal on the exact same diet that caused its tendons to contract, and claims an ordinary vitamin/mineral supplement will somehow magically undo the damage the diet is doing - that person is NOT helping horse owners - they are just making money off them.

    You can wind up with a foal that you have to put down or is too deformed to ever be used for anything that way - I will NOT endorse such tactics. Ever.

    The problem with these supplements is that the seller himself is the one that controls the 'experiments' - and generally, there are no 'experiments' or 'studies' - there's just anecdotes - all of them incredibly glowing.

    Explain the biological mechanism through which an ordinary garden variety mineral supplement makes a diet rich in carbohydrates and protein and fat, NOT cause a colt to grow too fast. How a normal mineral supplement causes the nutrients in the diet to not be absorbed and utilized by the body, when at the same time, it is recommended for completely normal horses to make them stronger, faster and wiser TOO.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2011

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