Weather and breeds

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by kareninthesun, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. kareninthesun

    kareninthesun Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 1, 2011
    I know that with specific breeds of dogs (and othe animals) certain breeds do better under specific weather conditions due to adaptations). Are the certain breeds of chickens that do better under the same (excluding abnormal weather conditions )?
     
  2. ChicKat

    ChicKat Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    kareninthesun,

    As you research breeds (there is a breed section here on BYC) and pay attention to the origins of the chickens, you will definitely get some hints. Also there are notations that will say something like 'continues to lay in winter'--- Thus a cold hardy chicken.

    in general -- Mediterranean breeds like White Leghorn -- are good in heat, and the very heavily feathered extra large birds (think wooley mamoth) with smaller combs that will resist frostbite, are better cold climates. Feathered legs are anther example of varieties of birds that are cold resistant, thus heat susceptable.


    It is a really excellent question in this horrendous heat wave. Hope this helps a little and if others have different views they will put thier thoughts in the mix.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2011
  3. kareninthesun

    kareninthesun Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you Chickat. As I viewed some of the beautiful pictures people were sharing of their chickens, I couldn't help noticing winter backgrounds. Chickens in or around snow, some being raised in areas where the natural heat index or humidity levels are high. Not long ago I went on a medical missionary trip to Peru, deep into the rain forest, past the Amazon and Rio Nanay, and in small villages odd community chickens flourished. Stories shared that these were not natural members, but brought in many years before and depending on whom told the story, it was either traders, former villagers or missionaries. I thought it odd that the deeper we went, the community chickens had less or near naked in feathers. Thought it might be mite related, but the air and trees were filled with brightly feathered birds. Made me consider that if these were not indigedous to the areas, that maybe over long term, their natural course of adapting was to shed in order to survive the awful heat/humidity. But it sure looked weird to see near naked chickens flocking about, happy.
     

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