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Weird yawning thing!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by MoonGoddess, Apr 24, 2007.

  1. MoonGoddess

    MoonGoddess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2007
    Philly, PA
    Well I tried to post on someone elses topic because it was similar, but no one responded.

    One of my chicks is doing this weird yawning thing. I looked in it's throat and saw nothing, so now what?

    Is there anything I can do? She is freaking me out.
     
  2. zimmy

    zimmy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My chickies yawn, too (and sneeze-aw!). It looked normal enough to me. Did it look extreamly peculiar?
     
  3. MoonGoddess

    MoonGoddess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well it didn't look peculiar except that she KEEPS doing it. Repeatedly. [​IMG]
     
  4. sweetmama65000

    sweetmama65000 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 11, 2007
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    my chickens do this, too. i have been afraid that it's gapeworms, and have been trying to find out what to do about it. i found a thread that says to use "iron of turpentine", but can't find out what that is or where to get it. and my local tractor supply has NOTHING for worming chickens!!!!! i hope your babies are o.k. i'll keep checking to find out what it is. best of luck!
     
  5. merryreader

    merryreader Chillin' With My Peeps

    Is she eating and drinking? My chicks yawned alot. They may do a lot of strange stuff, but try not to worry unless she has other symptoms. Merry
     
  6. Newchickenmom&kids

    Newchickenmom&kids Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 11, 2007
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    Don't know if this is what you have but I thought I'd share:
    Gapeworms
    The gapeworm (Syngamus trachea) is a round red worm that attach to the trachea (windpipe) of birds and causes the disease referred to as "gapes". The term describes the open-mouth breathing characteristic of gapeworm-infected birds. Heavily infected birds usually emit a grunting sound because of the difficulty in breathing and many die from suffocation. The worms can easily block the trachea, so they are particularly harmful to young birds.
    The gapeworm is sometimes designated as the "red-worm"; or "forked-worm" because of its red color and because the male and female are joined in permanent copulation. They appear like the letter Y. The female is the larger of the two and is one-fourth to one inch in length. The male gapeworm may attain a length of one-fourth inch. Both sexes attach to the lining of the trachea with their mouthparts. Sufficient numbers may accumulate in the trachea to hinder air passage.

    The life cycle of the gapeworm is similar to that of the cecal worm; the parasite can be transmitted when birds eat embryonated worm eggs or earthworms containing the gapeworm larvae. The female worm lays eggs in the trachea, the eggs are coughed up, swallowed, and pass out in the droppings. Within eight to fourteen days the eggs embryonate and are infective when eaten by birds or earthworms. The earthworm, snails and slugs serve as primary intermediate hosts for the gapeworm. Gapeworms in infected earthworms remain viable for four and a half years while those in snails and slugs remain infective for one year. After being consumed by the bird, gapeworm larvae hatch in the intestine and migrate from the intestine to the trachea and lungs.

    Gapeworms infect chickens, turkeys, guinea fowl, pheasants, chukar partridge, and probably other birds. Young birds reared on soil of infected range pens are at high risk (pen-raised game birds). Some control or reduction in infection density (worms/bird) is achieved by alternating the use of range pens every other year and/or using a pen for only one brood each year. Tilling the soil in the pens at the end of the growing season helps to reduce the residual infection. Treating the soil to eliminate earthworms, snails and slugs is possible but the cost is usually prohibitive.

    Gapeworms are best prevented by administering a wormer at fifteen to thirty day intervals or including a drug at low levels continuously beginning fifteen days after birds are placed in the infected pens. One drug that is effective for eliminating gapeworms is fenbendazole, however, its use is not presently approved for use in birds by the Food and Drug Administration.
     
  7. MoonGoddess

    MoonGoddess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, she is eating and drinking just fine, but she has been doing it all afternoon. She is the only one out of 15 that I see behaving like that, so that is the source behind my concern.

    Do I should just keep my eyes open for other symptoms?
     
  8. MoonGoddess

    MoonGoddess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She was still doing it when I put her back in the house today. [​IMG]

    Does anyone have an idea?
     
  9. SandraChick

    SandraChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    I does sound like gapeworm- but I've only read about it.

    sorry I can't help
    Sandra
     
  10. MoonGoddess

    MoonGoddess Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know...gah! I have read several books, but they only skim that issue. And not being an expert I really don't know what I am looking for. I did look in her throat, but that was the first time I have EVER looked in a chicken's throat, you know what I mean?
    Criminies, there could be Santa and his 8 reindeer in there and I wouldn't know it from the tounge!
    *sigh*
    This stuff makes me figdety and nervous.
     

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