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wet-bulb humidity question

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by LaGeniaLoca, Jul 12, 2011.

  1. LaGeniaLoca

    LaGeniaLoca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm using a wet-bulb thermometer to measure humidity in my homemade incubator. I've used this method before with no problems, but this time it's acting wierd. I have the water dish inside the bator, just like before, but the humidity is way too high. I can't get it below 60%. Is it possible to get an accurate reading if I put the water dish OUTSIDE the bator with the thermometer inside? I can run the wick through a ventilation hole....

    Opinions?
     
  2. Gypsy07

    Gypsy07 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm not sure, but if you've used this system before and it was accurate, perhaps it IS reading correctly and your humidity really IS above 60%
     
  3. bjash

    bjash Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you have another way of measuring humidity, I'd double check it with that. Otherwise, you can get a simple weather station at most stores for relatively inexpensive that can show you humidity.
     
  4. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    Does the ambient humidity change thru the year where you are?? Do you hatch at the same time of year? Or is winter drier than summer?
     
  5. bjash

    bjash Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It changes every day here (from as low as 30% to 90%). No real correlation at winter or summer (it can be 90% in both seasons--just depends on the day). Usually a local weather observation from the National Weather Service or a place like Accuweather will be close to your house depending on how far away you are from the location it is observed.
     
  6. cmom

    cmom Hilltop Farm

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    The humidity outside as well as inside can affect the humidity in the incubator. Also if you are running an AC or not can affect it also. I have used a wet-bulb too. To help correct my humidity I open the vents more to lower the humidity and close them more to increase it. What kind of incubator are you using? I also have another backup hygrometer in the incubator to check the humidity with.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. LaGeniaLoca

    LaGeniaLoca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 4, 2011
    Yorba Linda, CA
    Quote:Thanks for the replies everyone! I'm using a homemade incubator, made with a rubbermaid storage bin and a plexiglass top. I put more ventilation holes in the sides and put the water dish outside of it so the water wouldn't increase the humidity, but that didn't help much. I finally got it lowered to 50% by adjusting the plexiglass for a larger ventilation point out the top. It didn't affect the temperature at all, and so far is holding at 50%. I candled my eggs, and all but one are developing. I cracked open the one and it was not fertile.

    So I'm pretty happy with it at the moment. I'll just wait and watch, and hopefully, will have a better hatch this time. Thanks again!
     

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