What’s an ideal material for a coop that is on the ground with no floor?Q

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Arrowen, May 18, 2019.

  1. Arrowen

    Arrowen Chirping

    20
    90
    59
    Apr 3, 2019
    New Zealand
    I’m in New Zealand where the average temperature is from 10-25 degrees Celsius or 50-74 degrees Fahrenheit I think. I’m building a new coop. Question one: Is it ok not to build a floor but have it right on the ground? There are no real predators here. Question 2: If I didn’t build a floor, what materials would be good on the ground to make it work well for the hens? It is well drained.

    Most of the year they roost in the walnut trees. They also have the whole orchard to free range in, which would be about quarter of an acre. There are 30 hens and 5 roosters. (Two of the roosters are the white leghorns in the picture). Would love some feedback before I start. Thanks
    7DD714DF-79F0-49D0-B43B-33BE8A77BB67.jpeg
     
    trumpeting_angel likes this.
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Puppy Dreaming

    32,948
    43,413
    1,172
    Jul 16, 2015
    central Wisconsin
    In my big shed we use gravel. In winter it gets topped with hay, but you wouldn't need to do that.

    You could do deep litter. You could also do sand. It all depends on what type of maintenance you wanna do, and how wet or dry your area is.
     
    trumpeting_angel and chkva like this.
  3. Texas Kiki

    Texas Kiki Egg Pusher

    67,284
    278,491
    1,912
    Jul 31, 2015
    Houston, TX
    My Coop
    Here is a good read:

     
  4. Arrowen

    Arrowen Chirping

    20
    90
    59
    Apr 3, 2019
    New Zealand
    Thanks Texas Kiki, this is exactly what I want to do. Makes so much more sense to me. Great read. Thanks again.
     
    Texas Kiki and trumpeting_angel like this.
  5. Arrowen

    Arrowen Chirping

    20
    90
    59
    Apr 3, 2019
    New Zealand
    Thanks oldhenlikesdogs. Love the deep litter idea.
     
  6. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

    I have several dirt floor coops.

    My only pointers/suggestions would be

    1. Use wood that isn't prone to rot

    2. Make sure the interior floor of the coop is higher than outside ground, so in heavy rain it will never flood (so coop is on a slight rise of ground, everything slopes away)

    3. Realize that chickens dig! Plan to add sand or whatever to the inside on occasion.
     
  7. Arrowen

    Arrowen Chirping

    20
    90
    59
    Apr 3, 2019
    New Zealand
    Thanks Alaskan theses are very useful pointers thanks so much. Good to know this is what you’ve done.
     
    Alaskan and Texas Kiki like this.
  8. caliclucker

    caliclucker Songster

    77
    2
    101
    May 1, 2011
    Would this method still work in a small coop that has a hardware cloth floor? Should I just pile the "forest floor" on top of it? I have plenty of this substrate to use under my pecans and oak trees.
     
  9. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

    I would... and as deep as you can... since you don't want the chickens having to walk on wire.
     
  10. 123RedBeard

    123RedBeard Crowing

    1,207
    1,335
    296
    Oct 20, 2014
    Arizona
    I'd put down a layer or two of cement blocks ... over here we have solid 8"X16"X4" thick blocks (they also make 8" thick blocks) ... then set/build your coop walls on top of those ... then fill in a few inches of whatever your gonna use for bedding, so you end up with a raised floor area like @Alaskan mentioned in point two, of post #6 ...
     
    Arrowen likes this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: