What am I going to get with these?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Shared Acres, Feb 4, 2009.

  1. Shared Acres

    Shared Acres Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,411
    20
    201
    Aug 10, 2008
    Northeast Fla
    Ok genetics gurus, here it goes. What are my babies going to be? Any chance of Splashes?

    ROOSTERS
    Helmet---Completely naked neck white showgirl rooster

    Lola (the showboy)---One bowtied white showgirl rooster

    HENS
    Oprah & Nugget---2 black Silkies

    Star---blue splash, named Star? (that's how it was described to me, kind of a mix of light and dark greys.)

    Will likely be getting a white hen as well.

    Will likely get a Splash hen soon.
     
  2. flyingmonkeypoop

    flyingmonkeypoop Overrun With Chickens

    3,592
    119
    268
    Apr 30, 2007
    Deer Park Washington
    Well I can tell you that all will be silkie feathered [​IMG]. You should get some naked necks and there is a chance for feather necked birds. As far as color I am going to say you will get either white or splash. It depends on what the white is covering, for all you know it could be masking barring or something else lol.
     
  3. ursusarctosana

    ursusarctosana Chillin' With My Peeps

    465
    0
    129
    Aug 6, 2008
    Spokane, WA
    Quote:You always know so much about genetics. Are you going to comment about the Faverolle? I'm asking opinions of her in another post within this thread. You haven't seen her since she grew up, have you?
     
  4. flyingmonkeypoop

    flyingmonkeypoop Overrun With Chickens

    3,592
    119
    268
    Apr 30, 2007
    Deer Park Washington
    Lol, thanks Shanti. I havent seen her since she grew up, I will check that out right now.
     
  5. wclawrence

    wclawrence Chillin' With My Peeps

    If your whites are covering black, you can get blues,
    and if your whites are covering black, plus andalusian blue, you can get splash. You should get white chicks out of the white pair, but I assume you already know that.

    But like monkey poo said, they could be partridge colored, duckwing, never know until you test-breed them.
    But this will be test breeding their offspring.

    THe best news is, that since your hens are on extended black, and extended black is dominant to everthing else, they will either be white, black, splash, or blue. Unless I am overlooking something.
    I also think that at least most of them will be naked-nekked.
     
  6. flyingmonkeypoop

    flyingmonkeypoop Overrun With Chickens

    3,592
    119
    268
    Apr 30, 2007
    Deer Park Washington
    I was thinking about it and after reading wclawrence's post it confirmed the black. I knew I was missing something, lol. I remember a few years back when someone crossed black and white silkies and got partridge. White can be fun when you are crossing colors because of all those hidden things. I once got a cuckoo bird from pure whites because I crossed 2 seperate lines.
     
  7. Shared Acres

    Shared Acres Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,411
    20
    201
    Aug 10, 2008
    Northeast Fla
    The girl I got the roos from had at least one white in her cage that was producing some partridges. Hopefully, mine won't. Not a big fan of partridges.

    Someone told me the % once on if you breed a showgirl to a regular Silkie what the % of naked necks and regular Silkies will be, but I don't remember off hand. Genetics isn't my strong point.

    HOPEFULLY, I'll get a bunch of Splash babies.

    I might be getting a Splash hen from a well known breeder who said that some of hers seem to have the lavendar trait. Do you need to breed Lavendar to lavendar to maintain the lavendar, that color confuses me.
     
  8. klf73

    klf73 Mad Scientist

    Jun 1, 2008
    Maine
    Quote:you need to breed lav x lav to get all lav. If you breed lav to black you will get splits unless the black carries the lav gene(split) and then you should get 50% black and 50%lav
     
  9. Shared Acres

    Shared Acres Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,411
    20
    201
    Aug 10, 2008
    Northeast Fla
    What do you mean by splits?
     
  10. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

    20,149
    283
    401
    Jan 4, 2009
    Tempe, Arizona
    Whites can cover anything. Black is a completely separate gene than blue. While bl is commonly referred to as black, it is more correctly termed "not-blue."

    All chickens have some form of the black gene E. With silkies it is typically e^b. Black silkies result from e^b plus melanizers, not from E, unfortunately. (E would make it easier to create solid coloured birds.)

    Pg is very common in silkies of all colours, and will give concentric penciling to female feathers: partridge, especially on an e^b base.

    Grey is an entirely separate colour from blue, both genetically and in appearance, so calling splash a mix of dark & light grey is confusing. A better description is a lighter bluish base colour with uneven streaks of dark blue. Splash is the result of two copies of the blue gene; all offspring will receive a copy of the gene, and therefore display blue in some form, unless hidden by other genes (such as recessive white).

    The completely naked neck and bowtied showgirls indicate two and one copy of the naked neck gene, Na, respectively. Those with one copy will only pass the trait on to half their offspring; those with two copies will pass it on to all their offspring.

    White turns OFF all pigments, so that whatever colour the bird is genetically does nolt show in hte plumage. The white in silkies is typically recessive white, meaning that a white silkie has two copies of the gene and will pass a copy to all offspring. Therefore breeding white to white should always yield white. As with all genetics, sports (genetically unexpected results) occur occasionally, so very rarely two whites will produce some other colour.

    Because white hides the other colours that are genetically present there is no way to predict the colour of offspring when bred to a different colour. The only way you will get splash is if the white is hiding blue, which is possible, but don't count on it. If you do get splash, then you will know that your white is carrying blue.

    Lavender is recessive, and therefore unless the bird carries two copies, it doesn't show in the plumage; this is what split is: one copy of a recessive gene.

    A bird can be both blue and lavender,and will display intermediate to both. Generally a lighter blue, but the head, hackles & saddles will still be darker--its appearance is more live blue than like lav ender, even with two copies of lav.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by