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What am I missing if I become a breeder?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by patman75, Aug 22, 2011.

  1. patman75

    patman75 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I'm trying to figure what I need if I went the whole breeder route. Please tell me what I am missing.

    This is what I have. You can click on my BYC page to see my current coops and pasture set up.
    -8X8 coop with 11X20 run with access to 6000 sq ft of pasture.
    -4X8 A-frame tractor fits about 6 full size chickens. I only use it in the late spring-fall until my pullets get big enough to be put in with the older hens.
    -1.5'X3' big rubber horse/cattle feeder turned into a chick brooder
    - 4'X8' grower pen in garage until weather gets warmer and chicks feather out before they go in A-frame tractor

    What I know I need.
    -Pick a breed, Buckeye and Chancler at the top of the list.
    -Need roosters [​IMG]
    - Incubator?? [​IMG]

    What did I miss and need??? Comments, suggestion, tips, etc all welcome. thanks!
    [​IMG]
     
  2. sjarvis00

    sjarvis00 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2009
    Shawnee, OKlahoma
    Quote:My suggestion, First Join the APA since you seem to be focused on LF, Buy a copy of the current standard of Perfection,
    Read teh standard associated to the breeds you are most interested in. Learn the Standard well and read it once a week just to reinforce what you think you understand.
    Choose a breed or possibly two that really hold your interest, this is critical because you will not make money breeding, raising and culling to achieve the standard.
    Look up the top breeders for the breed and variety you choose, You can find master Breeders, and Showmen listed on the APA site, visit with them about the birds preferably in person at a show, learn some of the breeding, selection, and culling stratagies associated to the breed and variety.
    Choose 1 or 2 breeders to aquire the best possible breeder stock (This may be different from a Show Bird) based on teh breed and variety.
    Breed each line closed for at least 1 full year raise everything that is worth raising to learn the breeding habits and faults of each line.
    Attend several shows to confirm what you are working towards, but do not set the standard asside for the win.
    Commit yourself to a long term venture that will only have personal rewards and monetary losses.
    Do not aquire too many birds, overcrowding will prevent them from developing correctly.

    participate in the NPIP program
    Be open and honest with those you deal with and be ready to help the youth once you have things figured out for yourself.

    Most importantly have fun with the hobby.
     
  3. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    Oct 19, 2009
    Forks, WA
    ^ Right there! [​IMG]



    Although I highly recommend getting stock from a LARGE variety of breeders.
     
  4. patman75

    patman75 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:My suggestion, First Join the APA since you seem to be focused on LF, Buy a copy of the current standard of Perfection,
    Read teh standard associated to the breeds you are most interested in. Learn the Standard well and read it once a week just to reinforce what you think you understand.
    Choose a breed or possibly two that really hold your interest, this is critical because you will not make money breeding, raising and culling to achieve the standard.
    Look up the top breeders for the breed and variety you choose, You can find master Breeders, and Showmen listed on the APA site, visit with them about the birds preferably in person at a show, learn some of the breeding, selection, and culling stratagies associated to the breed and variety.
    Choose 1 or 2 breeders to aquire the best possible breeder stock (This may be different from a Show Bird) based on teh breed and variety.
    Breed each line closed for at least 1 full year raise everything that is worth raising to learn the breeding habits and faults of each line.
    Attend several shows to confirm what you are working towards, but do not set the standard asside for the win.
    Commit yourself to a long term venture that will only have personal rewards and monetary losses.
    Do not aquire too many birds, overcrowding will prevent them from developing correctly.

    participate in the NPIP program
    Be open and honest with those you deal with and be ready to help the youth once you have things figured out for yourself.

    Most importantly have fun with the hobby.

    Thanks sjarvis00.
    I had hardware, equipement, etc on my mind I did not even think about what you listed.
     
  5. punky rooster

    punky rooster Awesome

    Jul 21, 2010
    Quote:I don't.... it can become a big mess.
     
  6. saladin

    saladin Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,831
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    Mar 30, 2009
    the South
    I'd suggest that in addition to the APA membership that you join the SPPA. The SPPA publishes the largest Breeders Directory in the USA and Canada for old and rare breeds. In addition you will receive 4 excellent Bulletins each year that focus on breeds and breeding.

    Unless you are dealing with an extremely rare breed then I think Punky is correct.
     
  7. Debbi

    Debbi Overrun With Chickens

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    Missouri
    Nerves of steel, a good eye for culling, and a sharp axe. Also, you'd better start building more pens and coops, what you've got is good for a starter...you'll see what I mean on down the road! [​IMG]
     
  8. patman75

    patman75 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:The plan would be to try to keep it small. (try is the key word [​IMG] ) Max of 16-18 birds in the winter. I think I would need an extra grow out pen/tractor in the spring-fall. My current tractor only holds 6-8 chickens, which does not seem big enough if I'm culling many and only keeping the best.
     
  9. chickendales

    chickendales Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 24, 2011
    Michigan
    u need some thing that let u grow out 50 or so birds
     
  10. chickendales

    chickendales Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 24, 2011
    Michigan
    where michigan are u located what breeds are u looking for may be i can help u find what u want i start out with trio of nice birds and then hatch chicks and cul from there then buy new roosters when needed
     

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