What are the four best egg laying breeds?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by MissBay, Jun 13, 2011.

  1. MissBay

    MissBay Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 21, 2011
    I got Rhode Island Reds, Delawares, Buff Orpingtons, and Barred Rocks.
    I just want to make sure that I got the right egg laying breeds.
     
  2. chickendales

    chickendales Chillin' With My Peeps

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    all very good layers
     
  3. grendel

    grendel Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would throw thw Ancona breed into the mix,as they are non-stop layers.
     
  4. Lightfoote

    Lightfoote Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 26, 2011
    Quote:Those are each known for productive egg-laying. Did you consider the Black Australorp?

    A B.A. hen is documented/on record in Australia as producing 364 eggs in a 365 day year. Eggshell colour is a brown, variable from very light to medium dark (not nearly as dark as Marans eggshells). Golden Comets are also good egg-laying hen.

    Lightfoote
     
  5. ECBW

    ECBW Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Don't forget Leghorn. Unless white eggs are not desirable to you.

    My 2-year-old Leghorn took a couple of months off to molt and came back strong. My 2-year-old Production Red continues laying while molting. The shell from Red is noticeably thinner while Leghorn shell is still thick.

    My 10-month-old Black Australorp is rather sensitive. She would halt production at any slight disturbance. When I stopped the winter morning light, she stopped for over a week. Now they are in a larger coop with some new pullets, she has not produced for 4 weeks.
     
  6. rancher hicks

    rancher hicks Chicken Obsessed

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    Quote:I like this group and have them all.

    Leghorns and Golden Comets are good BUT. Unless you eat a lot of eggs you'll want a breed that lays not as much as fast.

    Production/Hybrids lay a lot of eggs over a short period of time. Where as heritage/purebreds lay the same amount over a longer period of time. This according to Practical Poultry magazine.

    I wish you the best with whatever breeds you choose.

    rancher
     

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