What birds do you think would make the best pets

Discussion in 'Caged Birds - Finches, Canaries, Cockatiels, Parro' started by aldren90, May 21, 2011.

  1. aldren90

    aldren90 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ringnecks rosellas or princess of wales i need help deciding which to purchase from my local bird raiser and they are all handfed babies and they will be pets so which do you think would be a good pet
     
  2. vanalpaca

    vanalpaca Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would discuss your situation with the breeder. Then since they are handraised, I would go spend time with them and see which babies seem to take to you the best. I would do this with new people buying my handraised cockatiels. We would bring the babies out and put them on the dining room table with treats and people and perches and see who the babies took to. They always went home with the one they spent the most time with and I never had any complaints.

    Your breeder will know the BREED of bird and its normal behaviors. So you tell them of your situation, including the environment you will be providing the bird and the amount of time you have for caring for it and interacting with it and the breeder (the good ones at least) should be able to tell you which breed would fit into those conditions the best. Also discuss if you have any other pets, plants, and mirrors. As some of those things can be hazardous and learn how to Clip its wings and toenails.

    Good luck with your 'keet!
     
  3. aldren90

    aldren90 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks and thats pretty much what i am going to do when i get there thats what ive always pretty much done and that works out great
     
  4. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    The "best pet" isn't as much a particular species, but how it fits with you. What do you want from a pet bird? What are you willing to do as far as care and companionship? Assess that first, and then find a species which is compatible. The three species you mentioned will likely not be cuddly. If that was what you were seeking, you may not be happy. Of the three, from what I've learned, the ringneck will likely be more personable and more likely to talk, so if that's important, keep that in mind. However, if you want a bird to keep just for the enjoyment of doing so, any will do. Typically, rosellas and princess of wales parakeets are more often kept in aviaries because they are very active and like to fly. Ringnecks are as well, but may be more satisfied with human companionship instead of having a mate or flock to keep it company. Again, assess what you want in a bird, and decide which species best fits your needs, and that will be the "best pet" for you.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. DebbieF

    DebbieF Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Please consider adopting from a rescue. I volunteer at a sanctuary and there are so many sweet birds there that could use a home. Pet stores and breeders are in it for the money. They usually don't tell you the down side of raising a bird thats background is living free in the jungles. At a rescue, you will probably be required to take a bird care class, that is VERY helpful. They will make sure you and the bird are a good fit, because they don't want to bring in another rescue bird.
     
  6. Chicka-boom Chicka-boom

    Chicka-boom Chicka-boom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 14, 2011
    I agree with Debbie F. There will probably be a bird rescue shelter somewhere near you and they do their best to care for the ones they have - but you would be doing a very good thing by adopting a pet bird from a rescue. We got our second lovebird from a rescue and are so happy we did. She is such a gentle lovely bird [​IMG]
     
  7. Ariel301

    Ariel301 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 14, 2009
    Kingman Arizona
    Quote:While I support adopting from rescues, it isn't always the best choice for someone who has not handled parrots before. Birds that have been put in rescue agencies generally have behavior issues like biting, fear of people, cage aggression, screaming, pulling their own feathers, etc. Birds with such problems require a knowledgeable owner who can deal with them, not first-time owners who are likely to quickly get disappointed in a pet that is hard to handle and then no longer want it (even if they did go through a class on how to handle birds). First time owners would be better to get a handfed baby from a good breeder who has socialized and cared for the bird properly.

    Of the ones you list, I have only ever been around ringnecks parakeets, and I think they're great, very curious and sociable, and the squeaky noise they make is rather amusing. But you should spend some time with every kind you are considering, so that you can figure out what you like best and what likes you best.
     
  8. Nambroth

    Nambroth Fud Lady

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    My Coop
    Quote:While I support adopting from rescues, it isn't always the best choice for someone who has not handled parrots before. Birds that have been put in rescue agencies generally have behavior issues like biting, fear of people, cage aggression, screaming, pulling their own feathers, etc. Birds with such problems require a knowledgeable owner who can deal with them, not first-time owners who are likely to quickly get disappointed in a pet that is hard to handle and then no longer want it (even if they did go through a class on how to handle birds). First time owners would be better to get a handfed baby from a good breeder who has socialized and cared for the bird properly.

    With respect, I disagree-- it's true that many parrots with behavior problems do end up in rescues and in foster situations, but in the last decade this is not always the rule. Lots of parrots are given up simply because the owners feel they don't have the time or money to dedicate. This has been especially true in the last few years when the housing market and economy has been so terrible. Some rescues are reporting that MOST of their birds are being relinquished due to financial problems and some are just because homes are being foreclosed on and people cannot take their bird to their new residence (often rentals). It is entirely possible to find parrots in recuses that are not carrying a lot of 'baggage'.

    Further, rescues will often set up potential owners to be fosters first, being careful to pair them with the bird best for their lifestyle and with the bird that you most connect with. If the foster situation does not work out then there is not a 40+ year commitment. They often provide classes and education. With no disrespect meant toward breeders... individual breeders usually do not do this (some of the best ones do but there aren't many). Pet stores almost never do.

    In my experience I have found that totally new people have a higher risk of creating behavioral problems in a baby hand-raised bird, simply though inexperience, than they would see in an adopted adult bird. Of course this is a generalization and some people pick up more quickly than others... however most of the cases of birds with behavior problems are caused by well-intentioned people that buy them as babies.
     
  9. punk-a-doodle

    punk-a-doodle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    On shelter vs. breeder:
    I see the value in both rescues and breeders. If I want an animal that I can have a good idea about it's background, family medical history, genetic make-up, and expected behaviors, I may go through a breeder (especially for animals I need for a specific purpose, ie. working dogs, or for young animals). For an animal that I would like to be able to look at and get a feel for the how and now of that individual, I prefer adult critters from shelters/rescues. I've definitely seen some shelters that were much more into money than some breeders I've met. It's all about researching *any* source you use, and finding out what is going to work best for you in which situation.

    To the OP:
    I think it's awesome that you found a local source where you can get a feel for which species and even individual you get along with best. Hang out for a while, spend time with the birds, since you have that killer opportunity. They may be the ones who tell you what to pick. [​IMG]
     
  10. DebbieF

    DebbieF Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Another thing that a rescue has an advantage is that there are budgies, love birds, conures, lories, amazons, macaws, cockatiels, cockatoos, etc; you can get a feel for a wide variety of species. An amazon isn't as likely to be cuddley as a cockatoo, they are all different. The rescue that I volunteer for, goes through quite a process to adopt a companion bird. One thing to think about is most all of those birds at the rescue, were raised, hand fed, from a breeder. There are several cockatoos at our rescue because for the most part, they are loud. That's how they are in the wild, that's normal. People find out that they can't get an apartment because of a loud bird, or they get tired of giving the bird the attention it needs and the bird may start negative behavior. It is a huge commitment to bring home a companion bird. When you figure your kids will eventually leave the nest once they reach adulthood, that might be 20 years. A bird can easily be a 40+ year commitment.
    Of the 150 or so birds at our rescue, I would love to bring several of them home. They are honestly so sweet. I will say that there are also several that I wouldn't want to bring home and most likely they will have a lifetime home at the rescue.
    If there is a rescue or sanctuary near you, try to find some time to volunteer and see for yourself. You will find yourself looking forward to your time spent with the birds and the birds will also look forward to seeing you.
     

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