what breed are these ?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Danragg, Dec 2, 2016.

  1. Danragg

    Danragg Out Of The Brooder

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    Rescued these hens from someone who did not know how to look after them, they are not in very good condition but i'm wondering if anyone knows what breed they are? I have been told that the brown ones are columbian black tails? (I'm in the UK if that is any help) thanks !




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    Last edited: Dec 2, 2016
  2. mustangrooster

    mustangrooster Chillin' With My Peeps

    My guess is that the red ones are Rhode Island reds. Or they could be red stars, or Production reds...very similar....but i reckon Rhode Island reds...

    I cant find the right name of the black chicken breeds..its ringing in my head...just cant catch on it...

    Im glad the chickens are in good hands now :)
     
  3. Cel45

    Cel45 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Production reds and the black one looks like a Black Sex Link.
     
  4. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Being as you're in the UK (thanks for the info), the names are going to be a bit different than here in the States. But basically, the red birds could be any generic Red/brown brown egger. Here they'd be called production reds, or cherry eggers, or a few other names depending on the hatchery. I imagine it's the same there...Colombian black tail is as good a name as any.

    The black bird looks to be a black sex link. I think sometimes you all call them black Rocks, not sure of the other names.

    Regardless of the label, they're all high production bred birds who should keep you in a nice steady supply of large brown eggs when they hit their strides.
     
  5. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    x2 with donrae


    LofMc
     
  6. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    x 3 donrae
     
  7. Danragg

    Danragg Out Of The Brooder

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    thanks for that! :) as for the egg laying nothing as of yet!! but maybe that's due to the cold weather or moult.. what do you think? should they lay though winter? i've heard people call them black rocks over here so I think your right ! I've only ever kept show breeds and bantams before so these girls are new to me (they are huge! but gentle.) does the high production leave them with a short lifespan? if so then how long do these 'production' breeds live on average in comparison to say my polands or silkie bantams ? :) thanks again!
     
  8. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    How well they lay is dependent on care and age. How long they live is dependent upon care and genetics.

    Typically, with good care, they will lay prolifically the first 2 years, usually laying pretty much an egg a day until the first molt (around 1 1/2 years), then scale back a bit the 2nd year, then noticeably the 3rd, then maybe you'll get to 1 or 2 eggs a week by the 4th and 5th.

    Some do better. Some do worse.

    A 5 year old commercial hybrid is usually a very old, and spent hen.

    Some of mine have played out closer to 3 years of age. Many succumb to ovarian cancer due to the genetic manipulation to create such prolific layers.

    I find the Black Sexlinks (our version of Black Rocks here) to do better than the Red Productions. Several of my BSL's have lived and laid well into their 6th (kept because they were smart enough to make themselves endearing.)

    The commercial productions need good layer feed at all times with sufficient grit to keep up with their egg production needs. I find mine also do better on a higher protein, 18 to 20% vs. the normal 16% in the less expensive layer feed, unless you have rich forage for them. (They do seem to forage well.) They can be prone to intestinal worms, which will bring down their lay rate noticeably.

    Overall good birds to keep in the flock for sustained egg production.

    Don't count on any meat out of them though. They are not dual purpose.

    LofMc
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2016

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