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What breed is my rescue horse?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by swissmiss78, May 14, 2015.

  1. swissmiss78

    swissmiss78 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 8, 2015
    I feel pretty silly having to post this - but I've always gotten quick and great responses about other things, so I am looking to the group to help me ID one of our rescue horses.

    We brought this girl home earlier this year with very little background info. She is 30 years old (!) and such a sweet, sweet girl.

    Any help in determining her breed is greatly appreciated! Thanks!
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    Last edited: May 14, 2015
  2. Dorene

    Dorene Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 4, 2013
    Hello:

    Your horse appears to me to be a Morgan, but I am certainly no expert. I grew up with an Arabian stallion and a whole bunch of ponies of different breeds, then spent time in the Middle East among the King's desert Arabs, so I am certain in believing that she is NOT Arab. When I moved back to the US I went to vet school in CO where everything is a Quarter Horse, and I am sure that she is not one of those, although they are a very common breed. What part of the country are you in? Often that is determinate of what is popular around you. But I would guess Morgan.

    With dogs, you can do a "DNA test" to determine the breed, but I have found them to be completely unreliable. I had a dog whose mother was a purebred Scottish Deerhound in a household of other DH's and one male Borzoi. When the litter was tested (to determine which accidental sire) they came back full of Yorkshire Terrier, DESPITE written correspondence. I have had short, long haired black dogs in my obedience classes come in as "Dalmatian" etc - so I don't know about horse DNA testing, but I sure would not hold my breath about its reliability based on my dog experience.

    I will pass these pics to some of my horse-ey friends and pass on any ideas that they have,
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  3. swissmiss78

    swissmiss78 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 8, 2015
    Thank you so much for your reply!

    I was thinking Morgan also! Except her head doesn't seem very Morgan.... Her huge head should be a dead giveaway for her breed - I just don't know what that is!

    We knew she wasn't Arab - we have an Arab gelding and they are pretty easy to pick out of a crowd. So pretty! And their movement is very unique.

    I guess because she is so much older, her movement is very 'old mare-ish' so it doesn't help us determine her lineage.

    It honestly doesn't matter a lot what her breed is - because we love her no matter her background. I was just curious to learn more about her. :)

    We live in Western Washington - about 2 hours west of Seattle.

    Thanks for passing it on - love getting the input!

    Take care!
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2015
  4. Dorene

    Dorene Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh! I grew up in Seattle and my parents live in Olympia (Tumwater). Such a small world. I am not really on this list but my friend (who passed your post along to me for some reason) lives here, so I will ask him to keep me posted on this discussion.
     
  5. Talithahorse

    Talithahorse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Looks like she may have some thoroughbred in her but definitely not full blooded. Her head and neck look thoroughbred like but she is more dainty. I don't see much Morgan but she might have some hackney, or maybe a small appendix quarter although her hind quarters remind me more of the pony breeds or small Spanish bloodlines. How tall is she? Kind of reminds me of a marsh tacky but those are pretty rare. How does she move? Is she light, bouncy movement or more ground covering but low slung (like a QH)? I like her look.
     
  6. swissmiss78

    swissmiss78 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 8, 2015
    She is a puzzle for sure! She is a smidge over 15h. Her movement is definitely not light or bouncy like our Arab. She moves close to the ground - her head stays low and her feet barely come off the ground. But I don't know how much of that is her typical movement and how much of that is her being 30 years old. :) We adore her. She is very very sweet and well mannered. Happy to have her in our family!
     
  7. swissmiss78

    swissmiss78 Out Of The Brooder

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    Wow - I am just looking at images of Marsh Tacky and the resemblance is nearly identical! The coloring and everything - and the head shape and size. I wish I knew how to find out more about her history. A 30 year old mare like this surely has seen and been through some crazy things! I need to speak horse! :D
     
  8. Talithahorse

    Talithahorse Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Marsh tacky's have a wonderful history and it sounds like your mare does move in a similar fashion. They were common during the Revolutionary war and are even mentioned by breed in first sources. They come from Spanish heritage although they were famous for their low, long ambling gait and great stamina as well as their ability to get themselves out of the mud in the swamplands. Sounds like you have a historical animal there. I love a good rescue. They so often make the best additions to the barn. My rescue is going on 32 years old. She is a percheron thoroughbred mix. Good luck with her.
     
  9. Rivenwood

    Rivenwood Out Of The Brooder

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    May 18, 2015
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    She's purebred cutie-pie :)

    Color-wise, she looks like a sooty linebacked buckskin, or perhaps a sooty dun. That would toss out being any pure breed that doesn't carry those genetics.

    Given that you're in the PacNW (hello neighbor! I am near Portland) I would not be surprised if she carried some Morgan in her. There were a number of Morgan breeders in NW Oregon in the 1980's, and Morgans can definitely be sooty buckskin. She could be part Appendix as well; that could explain a bigger head and account for a more laid-back gait.

    My understanding with equine DNA testing is that it doesn't really determine breed, and just helps assess who the parents are if you have comparative samples of their DNA. That was a long time bane for Kiger folks in the late 90's through the mid 2000's; every 14-15hh dun horse with unknown heritage people were trying to pass off as Kiger.

    Like the old saying goes: A good horse is never a bad color or a bad breed :)
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. duck-horselover

    duck-horselover Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 17, 2015
    i think it is a Morgan (i don't think it is a full Morgan thought it looks cross breed) i am no expert but i go ridding a lot and i am horse crazy i think it is awsome that you rescue horses and she looks like she has improved a lot you have my dream job [​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.

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