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What breed is this?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Ameer894, Nov 3, 2013.

  1. Ameer894

    Ameer894 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello everyone
    What breed is this?We call them "Arabian chickens :D"
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    This was in 11 September 2013
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    In addition, I have five baby chicks that are about 2 months old, but one of them is notably double sized his brothers (he appears in the second picture in the middle with his two same age brothers) so could it be a rooster?

    Keep on mind:All of these are the same breed
     
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    I am certainly not an expert on breeds, but I don't believe they're the same breed at all. They mostly seem to be mixes to me. Doubtless someone more experienced with breeds can help you there.

    I'd guess you already know the genders as well, but just in case (for whatever it's worth) I'll tell you what I think they are...

    Top pic: male, looks like a mix.
    Second pic: black & white one is a male, possibly a silver dorking mix or similar, and the other two are female.
    Third and fourth pics: male, looks like another mix.
    The last pic of older birds is a female. She looks like a mix of Buff Orp maybe, or a red sussex or something like that, but maybe even an Easter Egger. Also, her stance and shape are really strange. Maybe it's just the camera.

    Also, about the baby pic, yes, I think it's a male. Hard to tell because the pic's a bit blurry but it does seem male to me.

    Are you giving them any greenery in their diet?

    Best wishes.
     
  3. Pathfinders

    Pathfinders Overrun With Chickens

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    I agree, I don't know that these are any specific breed at all, but perhaps crossbreeds.

    Where are you located?
     
  4. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    All look like mixed breeds to me, or at least they're not all the same breed. I agree with chooks4life's gender guesses.
     
  5. Ameer894

    Ameer894 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you cocksforlife- you helped me twice I enjoy reading your analysis all the time.
    I live in Israel-Palestine.
    But please come on I mean how could my little chicken at the first pic be a male?

    I feed them some vegetables and buy for them food for layers full of vital elements!
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2013
  6. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: LOL, 'cocksforlife' --- made me laugh, anyway. It's 'chooks' for life, which is just Australian slang for chickens. But no matter. ;)

    (I chose that name as I originally began growing poultry to tend to direly ill family members who were highly sensitized to antibiotics used in normal (store-bought) meat. For this reason I use organic methods only. We all need protein to live and rebuild and it's a great way to help those who don't absorb protein well from plant sources and can't tolerate the usual plant sources of protein). Also, I intend to keep chickens for life... Anyway, that's why I picked that username.

    It's good to hear I've helped you before; you're very welcome and I hope I can continue to be helpful.

    The reasons I think the chicken in the first pic is a male is that he has male feathering. He's definitely a male. If you have a close look at his tail and neck feathers, then compare him to a known hen, you will see some big differences. Also his wings would have some 'fancy' feathers on them that are only seen on males once puberty is starting to kick in. (I really must find and put up a good pic of guaranteed-male feathering. I've got some pics somewhere...)

    If you meant the chick in the middle of the pic of chicks down the bottom, it's the feathering of his wings and tail that makes me think it's a male, but that's generally an analysis that only applies to purebreds of some breeds. However, I've seen it mostly apply to my mongrel chickens, which each have about 20 or more breeds in their ancestry, with no recent purebreds. In this case it's just the fact that it's grown out its secondaries before the covering little feathers that conceal the shaft of those feathers. Generally females feather out with all feathers growing at the same rate, not in a staggered pattern like many males do.

    If your chickens aren't laying, they should not be fed layer feed, as a general rule. This is not the right food to grow them on, and can kill them, especially the males, usually via heart disease and other diseases of over-nutrition. (A male has no need for such high protein, calcium, and some of the other nutrients like a female does). You'd think the manufacturers would put an obvious warning on the bag, or the assistants at the feed shops would be a little clearer, but many people are told to feed them all layer feed and it's the wrong advice.

    Cockerels raised on layer feed don't tend to live long. The reason I asked about their level of greenery in the diet is that they all have pale faces, which is generally easily fixed by giving them green feed. But you're already doing that, so it's quite likely that the layer feed is doing their arteries/cardiovascular systems no good, which would also cause the paleness of face, comb and wattles. Generally people would be using chick starter for them, maybe a type that matches the intended purpose of the birds as adults, or their breeds.

    Best wishes with your flock.
     
  7. Ameer894

    Ameer894 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you a lot !!
    Sorry for the mistake in your name, just using my aged smartphone to post a reply is very hard
    I recognize now how much it is important to offer my chickens (Males especially) greenery food ! And I'm already doing that so I'll continue, God willing

    For the chicken in the first pic, I don't know, She is aggressive (the main source of concern to my young ducks) but I still think it's a female, Because when I bought my flock I bought 3 females and one rooster, so how could it be?
    I mean I can't imagine her crowing and can't either imagine how could a rooster be so small in size and in one color only? "Orange rooster!!?"

    I want to ask you a very important question: "If rain fell on my chickens, would that harm them? Because their coop is not totally covered, just the place where they hatch is!! The climate here isn't cold at all, so when it's raining it could be 10-15c for instance !!
     
  8. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: No worries, it's fine. [​IMG]

    Quote: As for how a rooster can be so small, I suggest you look at the miniature breeds including Seramas and Old English Game Bantams. There are a few pictures on the threads I link to below this sentence. The adult Serama rooster can be tiny enough to perch on your finger, weighing only a few ounces. I've seen adult roosters the size of quail. A large rooster can have a brother who is tiny, too, especially with mixed breeds.
    Quote: Here are some more pictures showing miniature adult chickens. Some have a little kid in the pic holding the chicken so you can see how very small they are. There are a lot of breeds which are bantam and quite small without being miniature. The smallest rooster I've ever owned was small enough to sit in my hand, about pigeon sized. He was bred from a mixture of breeds including Silkie and Pekin. His brothers (and sisters) were all larger than him.
    Quote: Quote: Also, as for how can a rooster be in one color only, well, that's just genetic. In the wild, roosters are all multicolored, and so are hens. But we have domesticated chickens over thousands of years, and in the process developed different forms, sizes, patterns, etc of chickens.

    There are totally black roosters, totally white ones, totally grey ones, totally red or brown ones, etc... And every combination of color and pattern. A totally black rooster could be an Australorp, a totally red one could be a Red Production, a totally white one could be a Leghorn. Or they could be of another breed. There's a lot of single-color breeds.

    But the chicken we're discussing is a mix of colors; he has white in his neck, tail and wing feathers, red all over his body, and black or dark grey tail feathers. I'm 100% sure it's a male. He has the longer, curled-over tail feathers and neck hackles of a male, and most likely the shoulder and rump feathers of a male too. He's a bit pale in the face for some reason, possibly the layer feed being fed rather than grower feed, otherwise he'd most likely already be crowing. I don't doubt he'll start soon. He is only young. It's also possible that feeding layer feed to the males, instead of grower feed, could effectively sterilize them. I have heard of sterility before in males fed layer feed.

    Here are some sites with pics of male feathering as compared to female feathering:

    Quote: Quote: Quote: No, rain won't harm them under normal circumstances. Being descended from forest birds to begin with, chickens are exposed to all manner of weather including rain. If it rains in the forest, they have no choice but to sleep in the rain. Some modern breeds are so weak they would get sick from that, though. If they're under the weather in any way, as in not at the best level of health, a wet night can be all it takes to allow development of disease or respiratory infection.

    There are breeds adapted to all sorts of environments, from deserts to very humid and wet climates to very cold and snowy places. Some cope better with only one environment. Some cope well with all sorts of climates.

    Birds of most non-water-bird species are prone to lung infections if wet overnight, especially if they get chilled. No animal should be left wet throughout a freezing night, but that doesn't sound like a problem your birds face. Chickens don't mind being wet sometimes, but generally they'll avoid the rain when they've had enough.

    Best wishes.
     
  9. Ameer894

    Ameer894 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Super Encyclopedia !!
    You're right .. now I know why I've lost three chickens during the last two months, they where opening their peaks as they can't breath smoothly- it's absolutely relative to their lungs as u said
    Note: the chickens that died were from another "weaker" breed that we call "layers" - their feather is all white!
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2013
  10. themadchicken

    themadchicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree the first picture is a rooster. As for size, chickens come in all sizes and colors. My head rooster is a bantam Rhode Island Red and he is mostly one color except the tail. I do think you need to find something to keep the rain out. Anything will work. I used a tarp to keep the sun out of one side of my run this summer and provide shad, it also keep the rain out and the ground dry. even a big piece of plastic will work.
     

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