What breed of Angora do you think I have?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by BookWorm243, Jun 13, 2011.

  1. BookWorm243

    BookWorm243 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 13, 2010
    Franklin, NC
    Hello,
    I just got this rabbit ( Harvey ) today from a friend who took him on. He was very matted and and even tho she worked on him he still had way more to go. We spent most of today taking mats off [​IMG] Anyway I was wondering what breed of angora he is. I was told he is either an English of German but I am not sure which [​IMG] Any Ideas? The pictures aren't the best, sorry [​IMG]

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    Thanks
     
  2. Duckchick2011

    Duckchick2011 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 17, 2011
    Louisiana
    Not a clue...he's very cute though [​IMG]
     
  3. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    English Angora without a doubt. They are the only breed of Angora that has ear tufts like that. Visit www.arba.net for verification. Lots of maintenance!!!! I have Fench angoras and I am very glad for the lack of head hair.

    You will need three tools. A slicker brush, a comb with wide and close set teeth, and a mat removing comb. And a blow dryer that has a cool setting. Groom one day, and blow the next. If you aren;t sure if the bun has been blown before, hold him firmly til he realizes its a good thing. Blowing helps cut down on mats.

    Keep his feed to pellets, timothy hay, and make sure to have a chunk of wood in the cage as their teeth never stop growing - they need something to gnaw on.

    Feel free to ask me questions!!! I am fairly new to angoras but I have learned a TON lately.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2011
  4. punk-a-doodle

    punk-a-doodle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 15, 2011
    English. They also have rounder faces then most. I have seen some Giant/English crosses the either look like one or the other though, and some crosses go back a few generations. Crosses are more common if he comes from someone who was spinning.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2011
  5. BookWorm243

    BookWorm243 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 13, 2010
    Franklin, NC
    Thanks! Right now he only came with one brush which I don't even think is the right kind of brush. I have had rabbits before but never an Angora [​IMG] He is currently not fixed, should we get that done?

    We had one person tell us we should breed him, one said to get him fixed, or just leave him alone but he will end up with cancer [​IMG] We also got a New Zealand doe, so they said we should just breed the angora with her, and it would solve all our problems [​IMG] What would the kits even look like?? Any way where can I get those grooming tools for him?

    Can he have alfalfa hay? I just ask because we already have that, she sent him with what she called oats? They are little light cream colored things, if that makes any sense. We are working on securing a run for them, we buried the wire in the ground sinse they like digging, and it has a top. Hopefully we can get that done soon

    Thanks
     
  6. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    Quote:No alfalfa! The pellets have the right amount of alfalfa in them and more than that can cause urinary tract issues. If I could see him in person I could tell you if he is worth breeding, but one thing you can do to check for a preliminary review is grab him by his ears with your hand on his back and flip him over on his back - push his back feet down and if they go straight that is a good sign of show quality. He looks pretty moth eaten right now [​IMG]
     
  7. BookWorm243

    BookWorm243 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 13, 2010
    Franklin, NC
    Okay,
    So if I read and did it right, than yes his legs do go down straight. So we should take him off those oats and put him on pellets. Is there any way to tell how old he is? He does look a little bad right now but you should of seen him before! His feet where 3x the size and his tail was 2x the size of what they are now and it was all one big mat full of pee and poop [​IMG]

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2011
  8. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    Quote:Weigh him - that is about the only way I could help with age. English full grown max out (for showing) at 10 1/2 lbs. Angoras have HUGE feet and I love them ♥ Keep an eye on his butt, and do not be alarmed when you see him eat poo off his butt. Rabbits have two types of waste in their movements and the part they eat is good for them and they know what they are doing. That furry butt needs to be check daily though for poo mats.
     
  9. BookWorm243

    BookWorm243 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 13, 2010
    Franklin, NC
    He weighs 7 1/2 pounds, but he feels a little skinny to me. I cut all the hair around his butt, to help with that.

    Is it true that we need to breed them so they don't get cancer? I already called around no one in our town will fix rabbits, the one vet thought we where crazy for asking.
     
  10. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    Quote:7 1/2 lbs, he is probably 6-7 months old. I have never heard that about breeding them to avoid cancer. He is fine if he is left intact. He is also pretty close to the age where he will "blow" his coat. This is when you walk out and find a ton of hair all over the place. They actually molt like chickens.
     

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