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what breed of goats are these?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by VKat, Nov 11, 2014.

  1. VKat

    VKat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    First off- OMG GOATS!!!!! [​IMG] My DH got me this pair for my b-day.
    I am thrilled, and a little overwhelmed... but wow they are freaking cute. First big question- are these Nigerian Dwarf goats? Or might they be pygmy goats? I was hoping to have a breed that would be good for milking. I can try to get better photos too if that helps. This is a buck and doe pair, and he was told she may be recently pregnant.
    I went on a shopping trip and got Dumor pellets for goats, and a billy block salt and mineral lick. We have alfalfa hay on hand, and lots of good browsing here. So far they seem to like the tulip poplar leaves a lot.
    I need a goat care crash course. *head spins*


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  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Congrats! Goats are indeed awesome. :D

    I don't know about the breed type, sorry.

    Are you sure they're not related? They have some similar traits...

    I wouldn't let them have constant access to alfalfa, it's a problem for some goats.

    With any dietary changes, slow is safe, sudden can kill.

    Also, depending on what environment they came from, their commonsense about what to eat may be very limited so giving them free rein to try new things could be disastrous. If you are not able to identify the plants in their reach, best to do some reading up while you have time rather than end up scrambling to identify plants while a goat is dying from eating something in the paddock, as so often happens.

    Here are some links to pretty much all the info you'll need for starters:
    Quote: http://www.goatwisdom.com/

    http://www.goatworld.com/articles/index.shtml

    http://www.johnes.org/goats/faqs.html

    http://stopgoatabuse.weebly.com/plants-poisonous-to-goats.html

    Best wishes.
     
  3. VKat

    VKat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the links!
    Right now they are confined to a small part of my property where I can keep a close eye on them. Basically for now they are right outside my window in my future garden LOL.
    Once I can see that they are doing really well, I am going to move them to a fenced woodsy area just behind that. My property is full of tulip poplar, sumac, and sassafras, and a few oaks. So good browsing from what I have read so far. We also have tons of wineberry and blackberry brambles.
    I don't know for sure what they were eating before, but they came with a bag of dried corn as a treat and a bag of what appears to be rabbit pellets? I want to get them on proper food, but think I may only introduce it a bit at a time- like a handful to start with, and gradually increase that.

    They seem in good shape. Very active and they come right up to me! [​IMG] Still shy about letting me pet them, but the did just get here. Their hooves are in great shape too.
    Since they were sold as a breeding pair, I should hope they are not related!
    They are supposed to be around 2 years old.
     
  4. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    If you haven't opened the mineral lick and billy block, return them. They will just lead to your goats becoming mineral deficient. They are composed of almost all NaCl (table salt) and not enough trace mineral for a goat to be healthy. Salt is a limiter, so they cannot consume enough of the block to make up for the other minerals they desperately need. Pick up a loose mineral blend (for goats, not sheep), as it has very little table salt and higher amounts of the other minerals such as zinc, selenium, copper, etc.

    Edit: Loose mineral should always be fed free choice. Place a pan of the mineral in a dry location that cannot get soiled or tipped over (I attach a pan to the wall) and refill as they consume it.

    That is great that your DH got you two goats, since they are herd animals...but you are setting that doe up for an unhealthy life unless you separate her from that buck once she is pregnant. He will harass her to breed even while she is pregnant. After she gives birth, he will impregnate her on her first heat (which can happen quite quickly after birth). Her body will have zero time to recover from being constantly pregnant. Pregnancies and lactation cycles are hard on a doe. Too often will deplete her and her heath will suffer.

    He looks more like a pygmy to me. He is stumpy and broad. She looks more like a Nigerian Dwarf. But unless you have either of their registration papers in hand for any organization, then you will never know for sure. Anything is just a guess.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2014
  5. VKat

    VKat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hey thank you very much for the info!
    Do you happen to know if Tractor Supply carries the loose minerals? The billy block was what I was able to find, but maybe I missed the good stuff.

    We always get animals in pairs because it just seems unkind not to. I know that they will need to be separated. I personally abhor back to back breeding. I feel like the body should always have time to nurse and then have a well deserved rest! And I read that male goats too close will effect the milk flavor.
    I had planned to try and get them each a same gender friend so they won't be lonely and trying to break into each others areas, but I was going to wait and see if she's pregnant and then wait until she is going to kid. (is that the right way of saying it?)

    So far they pal around together like glue. I would hate to split them up and cause stress. Any ideas on how to go about that?
     
  6. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    TSC does carry a loose mineral brand, made my Manna Pro.

    Any change like separation will cause stress. But they will be fine, perhaps a bit vocal at first. Separation isn't critical until kids are on the ground, when he can work is magic on her again. I am glad you understand back to back breeding. Some folks just let their does have endless pregnancies, and then wonder why they are thin and sickly!
     
  7. VKat

    VKat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks! I will get back over there this weekend. Luckily I did not open that billy block.
    They really seem to enjoy each others company. Although he seems to be pushy with her as well as protective of her. He tries to have all the food and treats. He's very bossy.
    Won't they be less happy/secure/comfortable if I do split them up without providing them a new (same gender) pal? Will the doe be happy since she would have a kid(s) to look after?
    Maybe just the buck would need a friend since he would be alone? I wonder about this if two in-tact males will fight? Sorry for the barrage of questions! I just want to know what to plan ahead for. It's really important to me that they are as happy as they are healthy.

    BTW, Stacykins, I went to your website link and your goats are amazingly adorable and look wonderful! Thank you for your advice I feel really confident you know what's what. I also wish we lived closer and maybe I could get a future friend for my new guys from you.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2014
  8. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    Aye, they'd definitely do best with a same sex pal. Much better to have a friend, than keeping them apart but in sight. A wether would be a good bud for the buck, and they're usually quite inexpensive. The does can be kept with either other does or wethers. When the doe kids, her kiddos will make good companionship for her. Though knowing when she is due would be tricky, unless you had a vet ultrasound her to see how far along she is. I would absolutely bet she is bred, if she's spent much time with him. It is rut (breeding season) and their hormones are really strong at this time of year!

    I personally have two bucks to solve my buck companion problem, though they are quite competitive with each other! I actually put them in separate stalls next to each other at night, or else they'd spend the entire night tussling.

    Glad you liked the website. I haven't updated it in forever, as time seems so short!
     
  9. dan26552

    dan26552 True BYC Addict

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    Just thought I'd throw it out there that Dry oak leaves are poisonous to goats but not the green ones that are on the trees also check your fence for any holes it doesn't matter if it's smaller than their head they will try to get out (had a full grown boer doe get out a hole the size of her head)
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2014
  10. VKat

    VKat Chillin' With My Peeps

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    For now I plan on keeping a very close eye on them. They have been staying in my future garden area right next to the house so I can see them all the time. There are not oak trees in this space, just lots of fallen tulip poplar and sumac leaves from up the hill. The oaks are down the hill, so I'm glad I don't have to worry about that yet! Thank you for the tip.

    Their permanent area is getting finishing touches to make sure the fence is sturdy, and I'm thinking of building them some platforms to play and lounge on.
    I'm weaving saplings that I had to cut down anyway into the woven wire fence. It makes it stronger, closes in the big square holes, and looks woodsy and rustic. I worry about heads getting stuck since they have horns!
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2014

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