What breed starts out white and turns red?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Ivy061, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. Ivy061

    Ivy061 Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a chick about 2 months old who when I first got him, was yellow, however when his feathers started to come in they were red. I was wondering if he was perhaps a sex-link but when I looked it up male red sex links are born white and remain white. What could he be? In addition, is this something he could pass on to his chicks (Possible new sex-link breed?). He also has a single comb and yellow legs. I am pretty sure he's a rooster as he fights with others and bristles his neck feathers. Sorry I don't have a picture as my phone fell in a puddle the other day and I have it in some rice hoping it will dry out.

    Also, it would be great if someone could tell me if there are any breeds that have a golden lace color with a single comb. I have a chick who I think is a GLW but has a single comb.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2012
  2. Pele

    Pele Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 25, 2011
    Boise
    It's very hard to tell without pictures, but I can certainly give you general info.

    Production reds start out as a dark yellow/light caramel color, and feather in red. Roosters are very commonly put into hatchery orders as 'extras' because the hatchery is trying to get rid of them (everyone buys production reds for eggs, not for roos).

    Your second bird may very well be a Wyandotte if it came from a hatchery. I've noticed that many hatcheries are very lax about their Wyandotte programs, and straightcombs are very common when buying this breed from them.

    Hope that helps, and hope your phone is ok! Post pics when you can.
     
  3. Meara

    Meara Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 23, 2011
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    My red star female was a yellow chick and then feathered in red. Just because a chick is being assertive doesn't mean it's male. It's a personality thing at that age.
     

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