What breed?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by juliejohnson805, Oct 20, 2016.

  1. juliejohnson805

    juliejohnson805 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 24, 2016
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    I am hoping I am right that Sophia is a hen. The others I got with her have already starting crowing and have spur buds.She is 17 weeks old. What are your thoughts on breed? She was purchased as an Amercaunca but she has some of the coloring and markings that favor Orphingtons......


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  2. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I'm leaning toward cockerel, but not positive.

    Definitely not Ameraucana.

    Could maybe be an Orpington, if that was a breed available. What color is the skin on the bottom of the feet? If white, Orp could be a possibility. In which case, I'm thinking cockerel. The first pic doesn't enlarge for me, but I'm pretty sure I'm seeing the darker shading that's classic male coloring with a blue bird. Orpingtons, especially the non-buff colors, are slower to mature than other breeds so the cockerels can be frustrating for a while.
     
  3. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    I think cockerel
     
  4. juliejohnson805

    juliejohnson805 Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 24, 2016
    Central Alabama
    Bottom of feet are white. There were Orphingtons available. The breeder gave me one to replace one of the others that was a roo. The coloring of that one is what made me think she might be too. What are we looking at the make you think roo? Trying to learn how to do this .
    So, if this one is a roo then I'm 6 for 6. What is the best way to avoid getting so many roos when you wanted hens? I did purchase from a local breeder but he has been doing it for awhile and came highly recommended. It's just so frustrating.....Is this just part of the life with chickens that we have to accept?
     
  5. Cel45

    Cel45 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Buy sexed chicks, although still a small percentage of mis-identification. If buying from a breeder that does not sex the birds, by older birds. At 17 weeks and that much comb and the sclochy I am thinking cockerel too.
     
  6. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    What I'm looking at with this color is the unevenness of the color. Blue males have darker hackles and wing bows, and often saddle feathers. Blue hens are more even colored, no contrast in those areas. I think I have a pic of my blue Marans hen for comparison.....

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    Not the best pic, but you can see the difference in shading between her and your bird.

    How old are you purchasing these birds? Most breeders have no way to sex chicks when they're young, say under 6ish weeks. And then, you have the slow to mature breeds like the heritage Orpingtons who can keep you guessing even at several months......

    A pullet under 4ish months won't have hardly any comb to speak of, and it will be a pale, fleshy color. No redness to speak of. The exception to this could be a Leghorn or a sex link, one of the high production birds that start laying as soon as 16 weeks. But the dual purpose or heritage breeds won't have color or comb that young if they're female.

    You can also look at overall shape. Cockerels are leggy, pullets are more rounded and softer looking. Cockerels have thicker legs, but that can be iffy with some pullets having sturdy foundations [​IMG]. Shading of color can be a clue, and once they hit 3-4 months the males start getting hackle and saddle feathers.
     

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