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What breeds are these?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by beritbeth, Sep 25, 2016.

  1. beritbeth

    beritbeth Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi! I recently adopted 10 new one year old hens, in addition to the 5 I already own. I have been getting light green and light pink eggs since I got these new chickens, and I know none are from the hens I had before (black maran mixes) because they only lay dark brown eggs. I believe that our of the new ten I have; 2 buff orpingtons, 2 red stars (I've never heard of this breed but the woman who gave them to me said they were), 2 barred rocks, and 1 speckled Sussex. The last three I'm unsure about. Can someone identify which breeds the last three are? And, if possible, identify which hen is laying the green and pink eggs? Thank you!

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    Above are two I can't identify (possibly Easter eggers?) and a "red star". Below are the "red stars" with my lavender orp cockerel, the third unidentified hen, and the green and pinkish eggs. I know they all look a little rough right now but I'm hoping they start to get healthier soon! :)

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  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    They are Easter eggers. And I have heard of red stars, so that's probably what they are, there are lots of different names for sex links depending on who is making them.
     
  3. QueenMisha

    QueenMisha Queen of the Coop

    All three of the unidentified ones are Easter Eggers, and any of the three have the potential to produce blue or green eggs. "Red Star" is a common brand name for a Red Sex Link.
     
  4. BantamFan4Life

    BantamFan4Life Out of the Woods Premium Member

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  5. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    x 3 Queen Misha
     
  6. beritbeth

    beritbeth Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 4, 2015
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    Thank you all! One more question, the woman who I got them from claimed the missing feathers on their backs were from a over active rooster. Could this be the truth or is it really from molting? None of the chickens I had originally have molted yet and the missing feathers are only on the new hens, all but 2 have no feathers on their lower backs. I've only had chickens a few years and my first two didn't molt (as I only had them from late September until May) and my current five are just 7 months old so I haven't experienced molting yet. :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2016
  7. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    Definitely from rooster wearing, molting will start at the head and neck and work it's way back.
     
  8. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I agree you have Easter eggers and red sex links. Those red sex links are wonderful layers.

    I also agree that feather loss is from rooster damage. A molting hen won't be laying as a rule, and that pattern is more rooster than molt. Molting involves the neck and overall feathering. A solitary bare patch on the lower back and wings is rooster.

    One of my molting girls, during and after....

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