What Came Out Of My Chicken???

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by dridge11, Oct 18, 2019.

  1. dridge11

    dridge11 Chirping

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    Apr 5, 2015
    My crew is in the midst of a heavy molting....none of the flock of 5 is really laying. My RIR is usually super active, I saw her just standing there in a daze and the other girls were checking out her backside. Kinda runny poop dribbling out a little, but this thing hanging out of her (just the left side of what's pictured).

    I grabbed her to get a closer look and the other girls kept messing with her, she isn't usually one to get handled but she was super still and calm, very unlike her. I thought maybe it was some bits of an egg or something, so I picked her up to take her elsewhere for further examination and about a second after I lifted her up, this fell out. Kinda solid, rubbery feel, didn't mess with it much.

    What on earth is this? She went right back to her normal self after it came out. IMG_20191018_120740488.jpg
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Sequel, coach723, dawg53 and 9 others like this.
  3. boskelli1571

    boskelli1571 Crowing

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    agree with Eggcessive
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    That is the cecal core excreted, probably due to E. Tenella coccidiosis infection.
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    If you have it still, can you cut it open?
     
  6. dridge11

    dridge11 Chirping

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    Apr 5, 2015
    I did keep it, will cut it open and see what's inside.
     
  7. dridge11

    dridge11 Chirping

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    Apr 5, 2015
    Here is the inside...posting from my phone so hopefully this works.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Tycine1

    Tycine1 Crowing

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    That's lash.
     
  9. ButtonquailGirl14

    ButtonquailGirl14 Crossing the Road

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    Lash egg.
     
    glassdragonfly likes this.
  10. Tycine1

    Tycine1 Crowing

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    David, Chiriquí, Panama
    Found on the internet when I googled "lash chicken".

    These masses are produced when a hen sheds part of the lining of her oviduct along with pus and other materials. Lash eggs travel through the reproductive system, so they are often egg-shaped. The cause of a lash egg is salpingitis; an inflammation and infection of the oviduct. Salpingitis is caused by a bacterial infection that travels to the oviduct.

    Salpingitis is not always a death sentence for your hen. Many hens have a strong enough immune system to beat the illness on their own. It can be a one-time occurrence. Others can recover with the help of antibiotics. When a hen does recover from salpingitis, her productivity can be compromised. She may never lay again or may lay fewer eggs going forward. For a backyard flock, this is normally not a problem as fresh eggs are a benefit of having chickens but aren’t a requirement as many have names and take on pet status.

    Some chickens with salpingitis will not make it and won’t exhibit the symptom of a lash egg. In those cases, the infection spreads and grows inside their bodies resulting in death. A sign of salpingitis is a chicken walking with a penguin-like stance with a swollen abdomen. This is caused because the inflamed oviduct and resulting mass are inside the hen and festering. Eventually, the inflammation will push on the chicken’s internal organs causing the chicken to have a hard time breathing and ultimately death.

    If you’re unsure of what’s happening with your chicken, it’s a good idea to take it to the vet. Sometimes the vet can remove the infected mass, but this is risky, costly and not a viable option for many backyard chicken keepers. A vet can advise you on the best course of action.

    In a commercial chicken operation, a chicken that lays a lash egg is culled. When egg production is the goal and makes your bottom line, a reduction or stoppage in laying can’t be tolerated.

    Salpingitis can be very hard to prevent. It is most common in birds that are two to three years old. Make sure your chickens are getting a healthy diet and free-range exercise time each day. Practicing good animal husbandry is helpful in preventing the spread of bacteria and viruses that result in salpingitis. Keep the chicken coop and run as clean as possible by changing dirty bedding and cleaning nest boxes frequently. Many chicken keepers will dose their chicken’s water with Apple Cider Vinegar (the kind with the mother) to keep waterers clean and boost their chicken’s immune systems. You can also add garlic to your chicken’s diet either in the water or as garlic powder in their feed. A quick tip; if you add fresh garlic cloves to your chicken’s water, be sure to change it daily because the garlic can get quite strong if you don’t. This results in chickens who aren’t drinking enough water daily.

    In the end, a lash egg isn’t always a death sentence. Many chicken keepers have hens that lay lash eggs and live long and happy lives. But it is a symptom that you’ll want to monitor and treat if necessary.
     

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