What can a Standard White Ameraucana roo possibly sire?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by stephs, Jun 19, 2009.

  1. stephs

    stephs In the Brooder

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    ...is the only standard Ameraucana that this roo will possibly sire going to be white, too (provided the hen is standard white Ameraucana)? Is there another standard type Ameraucana that I can breed out of him, provided I get X laying hen, and what would X be?
    Thanks!

    -clueless in california
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2009
  2. herechickchick

    herechickchick Songster

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    He will probably mate what ever hens you put him in with. I do not think you would use White Ameraucana to breed another already standardized Ameraucana color. If you wanted to create a new Ameraucana color then you may be able to use him depending on what color you are after, but even still there is much more to it like whether he is dominate or recessive white etc... If you are wanting to breed an Ameraucana in an APA or ABA accepted color then make contacts within the Ameraucana breeders club and try to locate stock.

    I hope this helps
     
  3. stephs

    stephs In the Brooder

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    Well, yes, of course he'll mate with whatever he's in contact with! [​IMG]
    And yes, I'm hoping to find a helpful breeder through this thread.

    What I'm asking is what possibilities exist for him to sire standard Ameraucanas. I don't understand the genetics of color. I assume if I put him with a Standard White Ameraucana hen, then they'll make SWA chicks. What if prefer another standard color in his progeny?

    What if I mate him with a standard black ameraucana? A standard blue? A standard splash (is there such?) a standard lavender (is there such) and so on and so forth. What can he make with any given standard ameraucana hen? Because I only want to make standard ameraucana chicks; I don't want to make EE's. Does that make snese?

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2009
  4. SueNH

    SueNH Songster

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    There is a dominant white and a recessive white. One is technically called silver and I forget which is which.
    Depends if that roo is all white. If it's a dominant white gene it could be masking something else. Then there are modifiers.....

    Hatch peeps and see.

    The classroom at the coop has serious chicken genetic geeks there. They get real interesting at times. Sometimes it's way over my head.
     
  5. Momo

    Momo Songster

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    I think you'll need to stick with white because Ameraucanas are generally recessive white which means he could carry any number of colour genes. I have a white Amer roo and his first batch of babies are in the brooder now. Here's what I've gotten from him:

    BBS hens - babies that looked blue & black at hatching but are developing some buff coloration on their feathers (e.g. blue with buff, black with buff). Some still look solid black (2 weeks old).

    Buff hen - one black with buff colored head & wings (no idea what color the body feathers are going to be), one yellow/slightly buffish chick feathering out whitish/greyish buff, and one pale greyish chich with buffish head feathering out pale greyish/buffish.

    White hen - yellow/white babies.

    EE hens - wide variety of chipmunk babies, many feathering out with buff tones.

    So it looks like my boy carries blue and buff and who knows what else ...
     
  6. SueNH

    SueNH Songster

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    Kind of like the genetics on that pretty buckskin horse!

    Or is it dun......

    ; )
     
  7. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    One of the whites does not cover red very well and that could be the buff looking color you are seeing Momo.

    You don't want to use white to improve any other color. You can use black to improve your whites, but you shouldn't use white to make another color.


    Yes, Sue, buckskin and dun are two different genes. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2009
  8. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    I did have a white Amercuana roo with my blue and black girls and he produced all blues and blacks. He was from Gilbert lines and the hens from ChickHatchery.com. So the breed itself would be 100 percent Amercuana bantams.

    The blacks came out really good.
     
  9. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Quote:Neither dominant nor recessive white is silver. That is a third gene [​IMG] Dominant white (I) does a much poorer job of masking than recessive white (c). Think of white switches as being OFF switches that turn OFF the display of colours, which thereby also prevents patterns from showing. Silver (S), however has no affect on black pigment; it changes red/gold pigment to silver, which appears as white. Silver and gold (s) are the same gene--alternate expressions of the gene. Silver is the dominant expression.
     
  10. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    pips&peeps :

    One of the whites does not cover red very well and that could be the buff looking color you are seeing Momo.

    You don't want to use white to improve any other color. You can use black to improve your whites, but you shouldn't use white to make another color.
    ... [​IMG]

    That would be dominant white that doesn't cover red as well.

    Crossing the white rooster can be useful for determining which genes he carries; of course that makes the cross about him as compared with being about the chicklets.​
     

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