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What can I do about my male pot belly pig?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by leasha12345, Nov 25, 2016.

  1. leasha12345

    leasha12345 Hatching

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    I went to let him and our other female pot belly back inside their outside house for bed and dinner. I got in the pen to put more straw down for them and he came charging at me, tried to hump me, frothed at the mouth, and knocked me down. I pushed him away to get off, but that made him so much stronger and upset. He's a lot stronger than me. The female won't give him any sex so, he's taking it out on me. He's like, 11 months old and not neutered. We want him and our female to have piglets. What can I do to keep this from happening? I was frightened. He's normally a sweet sweet big boy.
     

  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Is there a way that you can avoid physical contact with him? Cleaning and setting up the pen before letting him in ? You are fully aware of how strong a pig can be and the potential for real physical injury. Male farm animals (and that includes roosters) that are raised as pets can become physically aggressive once they reach sexual maturity. They can be reprogramed, but this is not for the faint of heart.
     
  3. TroyerSis

    TroyerSis Chirping

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    Get another male and eat him???
     
  4. Weehopper

    Weehopper Songster

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    Have him castrated. There are plenty of abandoned and abused pot bellied pigs that need homes already.
     
  5. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

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    Unless you want to raise pigs for meat, I'm afraid my sentiments are with this option. I have two friends that do pet pig rescue (pot bellies, guinea hogs, etc) and they have waiting-for-a-new-home lists as long as your arm. They are awfully cute as babies, but it seems that a lot of folks never really take into consideration what they will be dealing with in just a few months when they buy one.[​IMG]
     

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