What can I expect if I breed...

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Three Cedars Silkies, Sep 5, 2008.

  1. Three Cedars Silkies

    Three Cedars Silkies Overrun With Chickens

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    a barred bantam cochin roo to a black bantam cochin hen? Will I get barred's or some of each. I'm concerned about "muddying" the barred pattern. He is gorgeous with crisp coloring.
     
  2. ...barred bantam cochin roo to a black bantam cochin hen...

    I *think* all barred chicks or maybe barred and cuckoo --- but not sure.

    [​IMG]
    Lisa​
     
  3. tiki244

    tiki244 Flock Mistress

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    Hi! I don't know the answer, but you could try looking up www.PekinBantams.com



    Well I looked it up and it looks to me like a Cuckoo Roo over a black Hen begits all Cuckoo chicks. And the sexlinked barrig gene is dominant. Hmmm. I am not sure if I read that right. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2008
  4. Three Cedars Silkies

    Three Cedars Silkies Overrun With Chickens

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    I think you are both right. I've been reading and the MALE barred over a black hen will give all barred. However a solid roo over a barred hen will give you barred males and solid females...I think...but I'm probably wrong!
     
  5. DTchickens

    DTchickens Overrun With Chickens

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    i would expect Barred. or both, also could be a mixture. You never know until you try, All birds are different and have different traits. so you just have to try
     
  6. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    Most responses have been correct.

    This is not a bad cross, as barreds are black birds with the barring gene so technically you are breeding TWO black birds, only the male has barring "added".

    Barred is dominant(and sex linked but this is of no concern for this cross).. it sounds like your rooster probably is pure for barring, and assuming both birds are pure for same version of black, you will get all(black and white) barred offspring.

    However..(didn't you worry that was coming?) barring also has a dose effect. Which means there is usually a visible difference between a bird with one or two barring genes. Birds with one barring often have weaker barring to varying degrees. You can really see this by looking at show stock barred rocks line bred for winning males, the hens are "darker" than the roosters. This is due to the gene being sex linked.. which means a rooster can either have one or two copies of it but hens always can have only one copy.

    It is relatively easy to get birds pure for barring though, for example you could select the best daughter as for type or body traits you prefer and breed her to the father or another pure barred rooster... and you immediately have a pure breeding barred pair.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2008
  7. tiki244

    tiki244 Flock Mistress

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    So Kev [​IMG] , what would happen if the offspring were to be bred back to each other? Or bred back to the father? There is always an however in there, isn't there?
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2008
  8. Kev

    Kev Overrun With Chickens

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    LOL! Seems that way even to myself also! [​IMG]

    Daughter bred with father= All barred offspring. (assuming the father is pure for barred some barreds with one dose still manage to look pretty good..)

    Brother and sister together= all sons will be barred, however half of them will have single dose, other half will have double dose. Daughters will be half barred and half black.

    The "however" [​IMG] could be surprises out of the sibling mating, if one of the parents were carriers for ??- say like the mother was carrying recessive white, it can be be by coincidence the son and daughter chosen for sibling mating both inherited the "hidden" white and so throw 25% white offspring. Same thing could happen if one parent wasn't pure for black, resulting in a couple off colored offspring.

    This kind of of surprise also can happen if the father was a carrier of ?? and the daughter chosen had inherited it also.

    Probably not likely, particularly if the barreds were from a line of barreds and the black from blacks.. but you asked for a "however"... LOL!
     
  9. tiki244

    tiki244 Flock Mistress

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    [​IMG] Thanks! [​IMG]
     
  10. Hi Kev! I appreciate the explanation.
    I've 'read' it dozens of times, but it doesn't 'set in my mind' til I actually make the cross / hatch the eggs and see it for myself.

    [​IMG]
    Lisa
     

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