What causes chicks to hatch out with bent beaks

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by cat1994, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. cat1994

    cat1994 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 12, 2010
    Southeast MO
    So I bought 6 Silkie chicks a while ago from a feed store. I picked each one out, making sure none had pasty butt or where acting off in any way. When I was going through them I picked up one that had a bent beak, it wasn't really bent, just a lil crooked off to one side. Every thing else was ok with it and I really liked its color so I got that one. Now the Silkie is much older and looking great (when he looks me straight in the face it looks like he is smirking at me). But it made me wander why it happens; you know why do some chicks hatch out with bent beaks? Is it just the way they developed in the egg or is it linked to genetics?
     
  2. StrayMagnet

    StrayMagnet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 10, 2011
    W. Georgia
    Do you have a picture of this lilttle guy? Very intresting.. I'm sure it is just a deformation. and if he's able to drink and eat and breath fine.. I'm sure he will have no issues with a lil crooked beek
     
  3. Erica

    Erica Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 5, 2010
    Hi Cat1994,

    I'm sure there are nutritional causes, but as far as I know it's usually genetic. Apparently it's not so much a beak deformity as an imbalance in the skull (in the cheek/eye area). As the skull grows the imbalance is exaggerated, so the beak skews even further. Sorry, I can't remember where I looked all that up, but it was probably Diseases of Poultry via Google Books. [​IMG]

    If it's not too bad, most people manage it with a deep feed dish and extra feeders. Good luck with the little silkie!
     
  4. ReikiStar

    ReikiStar Chillin' With My Peeps

    Issues with beaks tend to be genetic. Although I've read, in a few places, that a spike in temperature during incubation can cause it. But if a chick came from a commercial hatchery, it's likely genetic, as they can't afford to have temperature issues with their industrial sized incubators.
     
  5. cat1994

    cat1994 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 12, 2010
    Southeast MO
    Thanks every body, my Silkie is doing fine (in fact it is one of my biggest ones out of the 5 left) I think I may cull it b/c I don't want to pass the genetics on (and his smirking face can be kind of annoying).
     
  6. StrayMagnet

    StrayMagnet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 10, 2011
    W. Georgia
    Quote:why Cull it when you can adopt it to someone who dose not breed. who just wants chicks for eggs (unless it's a rooster).
     
  7. cat1994

    cat1994 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 12, 2010
    Southeast MO
    Quote:why Cull it when you can adopt it to someone who dose not breed. who just wants chicks for eggs (unless it's a rooster).

    Oh sorry perhaps I should be a lil more specific, cull on my farm means, sale, give away, or eat. Since it is a lil Silkie I won't be eating it, so I will take it to my local poultry swap to sale (if I can) or give it to someone.
     

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