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What do I do about my roosters?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by raisinginalaska, May 29, 2016.

  1. raisinginalaska

    raisinginalaska Out Of The Brooder

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    Hey all,
    I was just reading about how more than one rooster can be very problematic...I currently have 7 hens (well young ladies) and 2 roosters. These two happened to be straight-run. Can I keep raising them with my hens or will I have to kill one as soon as he is big enough? Thank you!
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    They may or may not get along fine with one another, but there is a possibility that they will start 'team breeding' the hens and cause physical damage to them.
     
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  3. raisinginalaska

    raisinginalaska Out Of The Brooder

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    Ok, I may look into slaughtering whichever gets bigger the fastest. Our goal is definitely eggs then meat, but I don't need to lose hens early because of the roosters.
    Thank you!
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. feedman77

    feedman77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would leave them all together.

    The roosters will go thru wild teen phase. But if they are raised together odds are the pecking order is all ready established.

    7 hens might be too few hens for them. but watch them as they get older if they are getting roughed up remove the rooster that causes the issues.

    It may be both roosters have to go. Hence you'll be looking for another.

    Give them a chance. Each roo will be different.

    I have 8 roos of different breeds in with 40 hens. Unless I throw a new rooster in the pen there are very few fights or squabbles.

    For the most part each roo seems to have a set of hens they stay around.
     
  5. raisinginalaska

    raisinginalaska Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh, that seems like a better option!! We are new to raising chickens and will expand our pullets slowly. Don't want to be overwhelmed right off the bat!
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Only time will tell.
    Once your cockerels reach sexual maturity at about 3-4 months, they may fight and both will try to mount the pullets... before the pullets are ready.
    Males reach sexual maturity before females do....it ain't pretty and can be quiet alarming if you've never seen it before.
    Lots of space to escape and aggressor, for anyone who needs to escape, can be essential.
    Having a crate(s) or enclosure(s) to seclude a troublemaker(s) can be a real anxiety buster for everyone involved.
     
  7. raisinginalaska

    raisinginalaska Out Of The Brooder

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    Could it be a good idea then to maybe have a separate area inside the run away from the main coop for the roosters to be during those times? I plan on getting more layers but don't want them being harmed due to the roosters.
     
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Absolutely....even better if it's out of sight of the flock, especially if you leave one cock/erel in with the pullets.

    If you're getting more hens you'll have to integrate them into the existing flock, best to have a separate but adjacent enclosure for that too.

    There are many ways to manage a flock, depending on your goals......
    ......but extra space and enclosures/crate/cages are always a good tool to have at your disposal.
    I like to have a several fold-able wire dog crates ready to set up at a moments notice.
     
  9. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    I use this math.
    One rooster to 10 hens. My Rooster last year was a Randy fellow and bred the heck out of my hens.
    You can keep two but I would have two pens so in case things get crazy, you can lock someone up.
    Or eat one of them?
     
  10. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    If this is your first year, I would cull them. I think that roosters take experience. These roosters are with just flock mates, who are smaller than them, they will quickly become kind of bullies to the pullets due to the size difference. They can become violent, with each other or with people. If you have young children I strongly recommend that you let them both go. Roosters often find children upsetting, and they are an easy target at eye level of a child.

    Roosters will give some signals, but often time it takes some experience to recognize them.

    One does not have to do the the chicken hobby all at once, grow into it. Have just pullets this year, cull these roosters, next year pray for a broody hen, have her raise some day old chicks, probably getting a rooster in that bunch, he will grow up in a older hen flock, they will teach hime some manners. You and your family will have more experience.

    If you keep them, you need some kind of set up ready to go, so that you can separate them if need be quickly.

    Good luck, this is a wonderful hobby

    Mrs K
     

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