What do I need to get started showing birds?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by JamesA, Dec 23, 2009.

  1. JamesA

    JamesA Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know I need good quality birds but what else? I am meaning as in equipment, cages, ETC......Am I going to have to break the bank or get a 2nd mortgage?
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2009
  2. hcammack

    hcammack Overrun With Chickens

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    I have some nice birds I want to show and I would like to know the same thing. Also are you required to be NPIP to show? If not what testing do you need?
     
  3. Rock N' Faverolles

    Rock N' Faverolles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ask 10 people that show poultry and you'll get 10 different answers, so I'll just share my thoughts on the matter. If you are new to starting out, I'd pick just one or two breeds of poultry to sort of specialize in as it generally takes more space to raise show birds and it's easier to learn what the specific breeds should look like. Whereas if you had 20 breeds you'll have to remember and learn the standards for all 20. As far as equipment goes, apart from the basics, I'd recommend purchasing a few show cages so you can cage train your birds a few weeks or so before you take them to a show. You'll also need leg bands and a method to keep record keeping. Some people do spend a lot on so called show supplies, but I never have and don't intend to. My philosophy is if the bird is good enough than you don't need to try to make it look good. A good bird will show itself without all the extra added bells and whistles. What you spend is up to you. 75% of the money I spend is on feed. I'd also recommend trying to find someone to mentor you or at least help you out with occasional advice.

    To exhibit poultry you do NOT have to belong to the NPIP, but your birds DO have to be tested for Pollorum prior to being shown, and some shows even do testing on the spot if you need it. Different states may require additional tests but to find out all you need to do is request a show catalog and it'll tell you in there what is required.

    Hope this at least answered some of your questions.

    David
     
  4. hcammack

    hcammack Overrun With Chickens

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    Rock N' Faverolles :

    Ask 10 people that show poultry and you'll get 10 different answers, so I'll just share my thoughts on the matter. If you are new to starting out, I'd pick just one or two breeds of poultry to sort of specialize in as it generally takes more space to raise show birds and it's easier to learn what the specific breeds should look like. Whereas if you had 20 breeds you'll have to remember and learn the standards for all 20. As far as equipment goes, apart from the basics, I'd recommend purchasing a few show cages so you can cage train your birds a few weeks or so before you take them to a show. You'll also need leg bands and a method to keep record keeping. Some people do spend a lot on so called show supplies, but I never have and don't intend to. My philosophy is if the bird is good enough than you don't need to try to make it look good. A good bird will show itself without all the extra added bells and whistles. What you spend is up to you. 75% of the money I spend is on feed. I'd also recommend trying to find someone to mentor you or at least help you out with occasional advice.

    To exhibit poultry you do NOT have to belong to the NPIP, but your birds DO have to be tested for Pollorum prior to being shown, and some shows even do testing on the spot if you need it. Different states may require additional tests but to find out all you need to do is request a show catalog and it'll tell you in there what is required.

    Hope this at least answered some of your questions.

    David

    Thanks David that answers my questions. I plan to focus on bantam salmon and blue salmon faverolles, bantam buff brahmas, and bantam araucana. Right now I have a flock of faverolles and I'm going to buy the brahmas and araucanas. I was planning on buying cages for training and bands so that's good to hear.
    Thanks,
    Henry​
     
  5. Poulets De Cajun

    Poulets De Cajun Overrun With Chickens

    PT testing, Vet-Rx, nail clippers, nail files, baby powder, wire bottom cages, good quality show feed, carriers, feed cups, puppy flea shampoo, a tool bag/box, gum, magazines, folding chair, zip ties, wood shavings, leg bands, camera, large scoop, kitty litter spatula...
     
  6. 7961

    7961 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A subscription to the Poultry Press is highly advized - devoted to exhibition poultry it will introduce you to shows, breeders and other useful info.
     
  7. JanieMarie

    JanieMarie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Well this post opens up alot of questions! Never shown before but think I'd like to.
     
  8. cw

    cw Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 11, 2009
    green co.
    would you want to pick one breed of poultry and keep just that breed to specialize in?
    this thread is gonna get interestin
     
  9. austinhart123

    austinhart123 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2008
    Los Angeles CA
    Quote:i think you need to have a NPIP to drive your birds through state borders, but im not sure
     
  10. Pathfinders

    Pathfinders Overrun With Chickens

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    Some good info in this thread! I would echo the suggestion that it's a good idea to pick one or two breeds and focus on them, if you try to scatter your efforts too widely, you won't be as successful as if you focus.

    The other thing I will add, is that it's a good idea to join the breed clubs of the breeds you're deciding to focus on, as well as to join the American Bantam Association and/or the American Poultry Association, which are the two groups which sanction shows.

    Poultry Press is the must-have monthly newspaper for the show fancy. Well worth the subscription.

    Also, if there is a local poultry club near you, by all means join and network with other breeders. You will find them to be helpful and (for the most part) more than willing to assist you in learning the ropes. If the club has a show, offer to pitch in to help set up and tear down, or do other volunteer work. Showing your birds is more than just showing up, it's a real community of people, some of the nicest you'll meet! Chicken show people are just the best, really.

    [​IMG]

    I have put together some good info for newcomers to the show scene here, see these links for articles about prepping for show (bear in mind, you need to get started many weeks before the show date! Good condition starts months before a show):

    http://www.pathfindersfarm.com/Articles.html

    And if you have any questions, please don't hesitate to ask me either here or in email, I'm happy to help!

    Cheers,
     

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