What do you get when you breed lavender roo over blue or lavender hen?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by muslw4, Jul 1, 2011.

  1. muslw4

    muslw4 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 7, 2011
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    I'm fairly new to chickens. I really like the blue or lavender colors. I have a chance to buy hatching eggs of a lavender roo over blue and lavender hens. What are the color possibilities? Could any be black?
    thanks!
     
  2. sjarvis00

    sjarvis00 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2009
    Shawnee, OKlahoma
    Quote:All of the offspring should be black. The real problem with the mating is when you breed them back you may get some Lav. and Some Blue the majority will be split for Lav. in varying amounts from 25-75%
     
  3. Three Cedars Silkies

    Three Cedars Silkies Overrun With Chickens

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    The genetics calculator says 50% black and 50% blue from the lavender roo over the blue hen and, of course 100% lavenders from the lav roo over the lav hen.
     
  4. muslw4

    muslw4 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Northern Illinois
    Ok, so then if you breed a splash over blue you should get blue? or at least majority? I know genetics can be tricky, just trying to get a mimimal grasp. If 2 blues are bred would the offsping be blue or black or a mix of the two?
     
  5. muslw4

    muslw4 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks, guess I need to find the genetic calculator and study up on some genetics.
     
  6. Three Cedars Silkies

    Three Cedars Silkies Overrun With Chickens

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    Blue/Black/Splash (BBS)

    Blue x Blue = 50% Blue, 25% Black, 25% Splash

    Blue x Splash = 50% Blue, 50% Splash

    Blue x Black = 50% Blue, 50% Black

    Black x Splash = 100% Blue

    Black x Black = 100% Black

    Splash x Splash = 100% Splash

    NOTES - - Black can NEVER parent a Splash Bird, and Splash can NEVER parent a Black Bird.



    Lavender

    Lavender (Self Blue) x Lavender (Self Blue) = 100% Lavender (Self Blue)

    Lavender (Self Blue) x Black = 100% Split (Visually Black, with Lavender gene hidden)

    Split x Split = 25% Lavender (Self Blue), 50% Split, 25% Black

    Lavender (Self Blue) x Split = 50% Lavender (Self Blue), 50% Split

    Split x Black = 50% Split, 50% Black
     
  7. tadkerson

    tadkerson Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Genetics 101

    This post only deals with lavender or blue as expressed on black birds. In order to have a self blue or andalusian blue bird the bird must also be self black or a solid black bird.

    For this post, an organism must have two genes for each trait. Parents can only give one gene for a trait to their offspring. The mother contributes one gene and the father contributes the other gene.

    Lavender (lav) or self blue is caused by a recessive gene. An organism must carry two of the recessive lav genes to express a trait. When you cross lav birds, both parents can contribute one lav gene to the offspring; so the offspring have two recessive lav genes. The chick receives one lav gene from the mother and one lav gene from the father. If a bird has a lav gene and a non-lavender gene the non-lavender gene dominates the lav gene and switches off the lav gene. No lavender color is produced-only black.

    If you cross a black bird and a lavender bird, the offspring receive a dominant non-lavender gene (from black) and a lav gene (from lavender); so the offspring are black. The offspring only carry one lav gene- the non-lavender gene is dominant and prevents the lav gene from working.


    A blue gene is an incompletely dominant gene and only produces half an effect if an organism has one blue gene. A black bird is diluted to a blue color(half the effect) if the bird carries one blue gene. With two blue genes, the effect is doubled and a splash bird is produced; the two blue genes work together to produce a splash bird.


    Tim
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2011
  8. muslw4

    muslw4 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks Tim,
    That helps. I didn't realize lavender was also considered self-blue. I need to get a breeding book. I think I want to try breeding lavender, blue, chickens. Maybe orpingtons since I'm having a hard time finding blue oprs myself. Just have to find the stock to begin with!
     

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