What do you use for bedding/litter?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by GwenFarms, Feb 27, 2008.

  1. GwenFarms

    GwenFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 26, 2008
    I am curious as to what others use for bedding. I have this year's chicks due in around the 10th and am going to buy supplies tommorow. I have always used corn cob pellets. This has worked great for me, but I know most folks here seem to use pine shavings. I was just curious if there were reasons why you chose one over the other.

    If I remember right I began using the pellets after being told that chicks could pick at the shavings and ingest enough to be harmful. I have a neighbor that warns me agains using the pellets too though...something about them holding moisture. I have so much success using the pellets in the past that I will still continue to use them, unless someone here changes my mind [​IMG]

    So, what do you use?
     
  2. joanna

    joanna Out Of The Brooder

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    well, I started using pine shavings because that's what was available where we lived. Since then, I've just used shavings. I like the way they smell, and they absorb moisture well...and I've looked for other things and can't find anything that is acceptable to use. I've never even seen corn cob pellets.
     
  3. 1acrefarm

    1acrefarm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 3, 2007
    Georgia
    I am experimenting with sand. I do not know how well it will do yet. Sand may be a little overkill in many situations but my coop is on one of the lower elevations of my yard so my coop occasionally takes on water. The 1.5 tons of sand I used raised the ground level inside my coop and run so maybe it will help solve my issue. I dug a diversion ditch around coop and run as well.
     
  4. GwenFarms

    GwenFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sand is acutally what the most respected chicken breeder I know suggested to me, but it seems so difficult to work with and I'm worried about the chicks ingesting it, but he says its not a problem. He says a thick layer of sand is by far the best thing to put in a brooder.
     
  5. AK-Bird-brain

    AK-Bird-brain I gots Duckies!

    May 7, 2007
    Sterling, Alaska
    Quote:I wouldnt be worried about them eating it as long as they dont eat it all! a little extra grit in their gizzards shouldnt hurt.
     
  6. 1acrefarm

    1acrefarm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 3, 2007
    Georgia
    My ADHD seems to be in overdrive right now. I entirely missed the part about chicks. I was thinking coop bedding instead of brooder bedding. I think sand would still work. I usually just use topsoil but you don't want that. It has to be changed a couple times a day. I just use it because its fireproof, has a sure footing, does not hurt if they ingest it and works good as a soil amendment when soiled.
     
  7. Tuffoldhen

    Tuffoldhen Flock Mistress

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    WV
    I always use wood shavings or pine shaving ...you just don't want a bag that has alot of fine stuff in it...I get mine at TSC and have never had a problem with chicks being on it....
     
  8. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Forks, Virginia
    My barn is filled with a thick layer of hay. Thatis then topped with pineshavings. My litter is about 8 - 12 inches deep - depending on where they scratch and dig holes. My nest boxes are filled with pine shavings.
     
  9. Gallus_domesticus

    Gallus_domesticus Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 21, 2008
    Arizona
    This is my first time raising chicks, but I am using aspen shavings over a layer of newspaper for easy removal. I've had no problems so far, but if I had a lot more than just the 3 chicks it would probably be too expensive.
     
  10. GwenFarms

    GwenFarms Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I received a care sheet from Cackle today, in anticipation of my coming order, and it warns NOT to use sand.

    "Do not use sand; the birds may eat it and can cause their craw to have impaction and cause health problems and death"
     

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