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What exactly is "medicated" chicken feed?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Flutterbee, Aug 17, 2014.

  1. Flutterbee

    Flutterbee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    For years, I've been against getting it in fear it had hormones that would make my chickens grow into Hulks. I've always gone for the non-medicated because I thought it was healthier. Today I actually began to look into it and started wondering, should I switch to medicated? My rooster has had a diarrhea problem ever since I've owned him (which has been about four-ish months when I found him lying on the interstate-really didn't think he was going to make it when I nursed him back to health). Anyway, I'm wondering if the medicated feed might help is butt issues. Anyone have any experience with various feeds? Do you recommend one? I'm currently using Purina and they don't seem very fond of it...
     
  2. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

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    Medicated chick starter has an ingredient that slows down the growth of coccidian, so that the chicks have gradual low dose exposure and can develop tolerance to the parasite. It is not an antibiotic, and doesn't treat chickens who are sick with coccidiosis. So not at all helpful for your adult bird who'sill. You can have a fecal sample checked to identify possible parasites, or assume he's got everything and worm your flock with a broad spectrum wormer. Mary
     
  3. Flutterbee

    Flutterbee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you so much! Do you know of a good dewormer? Do I just purchase it at my local feed store or do I have to order if from somewhere?
     
  4. btruegs

    btruegs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Had the same question, thanks for posting!
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    It depends on the medication thats in the feed,

    Starter feeds generally either Amprolium or Lasalocid as a active ingredient.
    Amprolium - which goes by the trade names Corid and Amprovine, Amprolium, Amprol, Anticoccid and is a thiamine analog, competitively inhibits the active transport of thiamine (B1) by doing so it starves the coccidia. Amprolium is used in the prevention and treatment of coccidiosis.

    Lasalocid - goes by the trade name Bovatec. Bovatec (lasalocid) is a coccidiocide that kills coccidia. It is an ionophore that moves potassium, sodium, calcium and magnesium into the cell causing the cell to burst. Bovatec works primarily on a single developmental stage of coccidia, providing a more narrow range of action than Deccox.

    Some growers contain Bacitracin as a active ingredient.
    Bacitracin - Bacitracin can also go by the names Bacitracin Methylene Disalicylate and BMD. Bacitracin in Broiler And Replacement Chickens is an aid in prevention and control of necrotic enteritis caused by Clostridium perfringens susceptible to bacitracin methylene disalicylate.
     
  6. Flutterbee

    Flutterbee Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you so much! So would you recommend getting medicated feed or do you personally prefer to stick to non-medicated?
     
  7. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    I recommend feeding medicated feed.
    The feed that I use doesn't come medicated but I do use Corid in the chicks water, chicks are a lot healthier, grow faster, etc.
     
  8. Folly's place

    Folly's place Overrun With Chickens

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    Chris, I've only seen amprolium in chick starter rations at the fee stores; never lasalocid. And I wouldn't see the need for feeding antibiotics to chicks in the small backyard flock situations most of us have. That's why I grow my own birds, to avoid that huge commercial broiler house environment. Corid works great as treatment for coccidia, but only if needed, IMO. So far I've not had coccidiosis here, and I'd love that to continue. I use ivermectin as a general wormer once a year or so; it's easy and so far no tapeworm issues here either. [​IMG] Mary
     

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