What happens when you add a daddy?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by mikeinri, Nov 9, 2011.

  1. mikeinri

    mikeinri Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 8, 2011
    North Smithfield, RI
    Here we go. So I have 12 very happy ladies. (7 RIR and 5 leghorns) They are about 6-7 months old and cranking out eggs. My question is what happens if I add a rooster? Sugar daddy will start getting jiggy with the ladies and what happens to my wonderful eggs? I like scrambled minus the feathers. Do I check each egg with a light before it goes in the fridge? Also how long after you separate the roo from the ladies will they produce non-fertile eggs? Is there a difference? [​IMG]
     
  2. Pinky

    Pinky Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 15, 2008
    South GA
    Nothing noticable will happen to your eggs, unless you know what to look for. Just collect them every day.
     
  3. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Some form of this question gets asked about rwice a day here. The answer, you can`t tell the difference in taste, quality, or production. No need to candle the eggs. Takes about 3-4 weeks for the roosters influence to be nil. If you add a rooster, make sure he`s mature. So many folks add a young rooster and complain because the girls hate him and pick on him
    A mature cock will rule and treat the ladies with respect.......Pop
     
  4. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    There is no difference in taste or nutrition between fertile and unfertilized eggs. Fertile eggs will NOT develop at all unless there is either natural or artificial incubation, and that requires 99 - 101 degrees. A hen has to set on the eggs to incubate 'em for anything to begin developing. Setting requires her to stay on the nest all the time, not leave the nest to roost at night.

    So, gather 'em daily and don't worry about it.
     
  5. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    We're talking ONE cell. That's it. You've eaten lots and lots of fertilized eggs in your life, as have all of us. Unless you have great eyesight or use a magnifying glass and know what you are looking for, you'd never see it in a 100 years.
     
  6. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Fred's Hens :

    We're talking ONE cell. That's it. You've eaten lots and lots of fertilized eggs in your life, as have all of us. Unless you have great eyesight or use a magnifying glass and know what you are looking for, you'd never see it in a 100 years.

    Technically it's not even one cell, it's just a half, the lesser half. LOL

    Sorry, joking aside, once the ovum on the yolk is fertilized, there are a "few" rounds of cell devision resulting to a blastderm prior to stasis.... but for all intensive purposes... nothing is different.​
     
  7. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Quote:Technically it's not even one cell, it's just a half, the lesser half. LOL

    Sorry, joking aside, once the ovum on the yolk is fertilized, there are a "few" rounds of cell devision resulting to a blastderm prior to stasis.... but for all intensive purposes... nothing is different.

    Aye.
     
  8. mikeinri

    mikeinri Out Of The Brooder

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    39
    Nov 8, 2011
    North Smithfield, RI
    Ok, thank you.
    That opens up next spring ideas of adding to the flock and hatching chicks. After fencing is done and the winter passes. [​IMG]
    Good thing I love eggnog, the ladies are very productive!
     

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