WHAT I LEARNED ABOUT WORMS AND COCCIDIA!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Radseg, Jan 29, 2015.

  1. Radseg

    Radseg Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi, All. I first read about worming chickens on this website. I'm a first-time chicken owner of 3 hens, now 9 months old. They've become more like pets than anything else, as they've shown to enjoy our company or at least curiosity in our comings and goings--I like to think they like us.

    Anyway, our favorite girl, Dinah, had a leg injury several weeks ago (only symptom was a very bad limp). They free range during the day, and she came home limping one afternoon. Okay, we confined her for a few weeks, seeing gradual improvement over time. She never stopped eating or drinking and had a "luxury" pen away from her flockmates. After about 2 weeks, we started letting her out for periods, to dust bathe and peck around in the barn. After a little more time, we gave her short, supervised outings outside. Reintroduction started slowly after about 3 weeks--hated that part! She was already at the bottom of the pecking order, so the other 2 were a little rough on her for a few days--but, again, I didn't turn her loose or leave them unattended for the first several days.

    So here we are 6 weeks later. Her leg is nearly 100% improved. She's been back with the flock for 3 weeks maybe. All of sudden, 2 days ago, she seemed to have difficulty walking around. She'd walk a little, then sit down. She seemed a little wobbly, too, seeming to lose her balance, nearly rolling to one side when lying down. But she was eating and drinking normally. Hmmm. Now what??!! And then I saw her have a projectile-type, clear, liquid poo. Uh oh. And a little while later, I looked at a "normal dropping" (which I've done many times after reading about worming, wondering if I needed to do it) and SAW WORMS WAVING AROUND!!! Gross!!! I made the assumption they were round worms--spaghetti-like.

    Ran to Tractor Supply and bought a bottle of Wazine (which is Piperazine). We did the math to convert treatment of 100 chickens to only 3 (1.9ml, same as 1.9cc, in 8oz water). That was their only water source for the day--I actually made up a second batch later in the day, as they had emptied the feeder. In the future, I'll give 32oz of treated water (with 7.4ml Wazine) for the day.

    After reading on the label that it wasn't to be given to egg-producing chickens, I contacted the manufacturer and had a very nice conversation with the plant manager, Vic Kelly (704-372-5613) to ask if we could never again eat the eggs. What he told me, straight from the FDA, was: wait 14 days if butchering to eat chicken, and discard eggs for 17 days after treatment. He said semi-annual worming was fine, depending on where you live (heat and humidity promote worm activity) or only treat when you see worms in droppings or chicken seems "off." He also told me that round worms are the most common one picked up by chickens.

    That brings us to today. Dinah still "off" this morning, although still eating and drinking. I made a few phone calls and found a vet nearby who treats chickens!!!! Off we went, with her in a dog carrier. I took in a fresh dropping for microscopic exam, as well. He didn't see worms, but he found COCCIDIA!!!!!! He looked her over and didn't see any mites or anything. Gave her a B12 shot--she weighed in at only 3.2lbs--to jump start her recovery, and gave me Albon Oral Suspension by Pfizer (Sulfadimethoxine) to add to their water (must treat entire flock) for a total of 7 days (first day with 20ml added to a gallon, then 10ml to a gallon for the next 6 days). We're hoping Dinah makes a speedy recovery.

    I wanted to share our story, as it's been very stressful and somewhat frustrating trying to sift through all of the info online. I want to say to (especially) new chicken owners, please, DON'T have a mindset that you want to "keep it natural" and refuse to give medicine or worm your chickens. I would have done things differently had I accepted the truths that worms and parasites are, indeed, everywhere--even if chickens were never raised on your property. These chemical interventions DO play a role--an important one--in achieving and maintaining optimal health in your chickens!!

    The paragraph below is from Wikipedia. I hope my experience helps other chickens and the people who love them...

    Coccidiosis is a parasitic disease of the intestinal tract of animals caused by coccidian protozoa. The disease spreads from one animal to another by contact with infected feces or ingestion of infected tissue. Diarrhea, which may become bloody in severe cases, is the primary symptom. Most animals infected with coccidia are asymptomatic, but young or immunocompromised animals may suffer severe symptoms and death.
     
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  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    There's a 5 day withdrawal period after the last dosing of sulfadimethoxine:
    http://www.sheepandgoat.com/articles/CoccidostatsTable.pdf
    If you have a cocci problem in the future, use Corid (amprolium.) There are 9 types of cocci that a chicken can get, corid treats all of them. Sulfa drugs treat 2 types.
    People are in denial or have tunnel vision when they think or say their birds dont ever get worms. Organics dont cut it. Been there done that long ago. Additionally you might consider using a broad spectrum wormer such as safeguard liquid goat wormer or valbazen liquid cattle/sheep wormer the next time you worm your birds. Chickens get many types of worms and wazine only gets rid of large roundworms. BTW: Wazine dosage is one ounce per gallon of water, no matter if it's one chicken or 1000 chickens for 24 hours only. It's best to set it out before letting chickens out of their house in the morning and it must be their sole source of water to drink during the day. It can be disposed of after they go to roost for the night, then provide regular fresh water for them to drink the next morning.
     
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  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    Good post, thanks for sharing!

    -Kathy
     
  4. Radseg

    Radseg Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 26, 2014
    Albertville, Alabama
    Thanks to you both. Yes, I forgot all about the withdrawal period after the Albon--and the vet didn't mention it. Thanks for that. I'll look into the other wormers and sulfa drugs for the future. I hope the Albon does the trick, but I'll take in additional droppings for analysis in, what, a couple of weeks? That will be a week after the 7 day treatment course. But I suppose the other med must be prescribed, as well?

    Thanks. Oh. Almost forgot again: the vet said to NEVER apply the Blue Spray near or on feathers!! It doesn't allow oxygenation. She said to use Betadine for wounds, wrap if necessary, and segregate if others peck.

    Who knew this little "hobby" would be so complicated?! Oy.
     
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  5. MrsBrooke

    MrsBrooke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Blue Spray = Blue Kote?

    That's interesting. I always use iodine to "hide" any exposed areas. Works like a charm. :)

    MrsB
     
  6. Radseg

    Radseg Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 26, 2014
    Albertville, Alabama
    Thanks, Mrs B. Yes, I meant Blue Kote. So many people talk about using it. I bought the small bottle of Blue Wound Lotion (recommended by Tractor Supply) when the other chicks pecked her comb and drew blood. I remember seeing the results of cannibalism as a child on my granny's farm and was mildly terrified it would happen to Dinah. The TSC folks also recommended using "liquid bandage" for injuries--maybe not such a good idea...
     
  7. Radseg

    Radseg Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 26, 2014
    Albertville, Alabama
    Dawg, I called my vet and was told they do carry Corid, but feel the Albon works better and that it should do the trick. They also said 14 days withdrawal from eggs and I could bring in droppings for re-check a week after treatment.

    BTW, I like your posts. Very informative and technical. Yes, you're right that I didn't need to reduce the Wazine formula. Duh. [​IMG] But it was a good exercise!

    Chris
     
  8. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Sulfa drugs work only against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria maxima which your hen mightve been diagnosed. Sulfa drugs do not treat Eimeria tenalla. Sulfa drugs have antibacterial action whereas Corid is a thiamine blocker not requiring a withdrawal period. Actually, corid is a safer medication/treatment. Your vet is a good one, you're lucky.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2015
  9. Radseg

    Radseg Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 26, 2014
    Albertville, Alabama
    Hey, Dawg. I read the page on coccidiosis on the Merck website. You know your stuff! I see where you got the 5 day withdrawal from. Let's hope my vet made the correct dx...
     
  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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