What implement of destruction do I need

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by sweetcorn, Sep 12, 2008.

  1. sweetcorn

    sweetcorn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 2, 2008
    Northern Indiana
    to cut windows and doors into a coated steel shed? Found a cheap one on sale and want to try to adapt it to a coop. Thanks
     
  2. Omran

    Omran Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 26, 2008
    Bagdad KY
    Try to use a jig saw if you have one it has less viberation than any other tool.
    Omran
     
  3. rooster-red

    rooster-red Here comes the Rooster

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    My favorite weapon is a sawsall. [​IMG]
     
  4. sweetcorn

    sweetcorn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We just have a circular saw and a sawzall . Would the circular saw work ? I'll rent or borrow a jig if I have to I guess but I'd rather not have to buy one . Do i need a special saw blade?

    What do u guys do to finish off the sharp edges on doorways added into a metal shed also ?
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2008
  5. sweetcorn

    sweetcorn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Northern Indiana
    I didnt see rooster 's post until after I reposted. A sawzall would work too huh ? Special blade?
     
  6. Omran

    Omran Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 26, 2008
    Bagdad KY
    Quote:a sawzall will work too,use a metal blade but be careful it viberate quite a lot.
    good luck
    omran
     
  7. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    You could also use your circular saw with a smooth metal blade, you can buy them anywhere pretty cheap ( $ 7-9.00 ). this will offer a staighter cut , less vibration, and ease of use. just wear some gogles, then file the sharp edges if you like, be careful!!!!
     
  8. sweetcorn

    sweetcorn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Northern Indiana
    Gonna "let" the hubby ( or make , lol ) do the sawing. His biceps are more impressive than mine by a longshot so he can probably control the thing [​IMG] Anybody on how to finish off the sharp edges?
     
  9. Cetawin

    Cetawin Chicken Beader

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    You can use a jigsaw and they can be rented. You would need to buy a metal cutting blade for it but that is a breeze. A sawzall is a great weapon to use also. If you are not familiar with using a circular saw, I would not recommend using one on metal. They are bulkier, heavier and more difficult to use if you are not used to one. So, you have choices of weapons. Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2008
  10. pdpatch

    pdpatch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    saws all ~ the cut lines are not all that straight it was design to do ruff cuts. The teeth on the blade should be two for the thickness of the metal. Good metal blades run about $2 to $3 each. a variable speed on is better the a fixed speed one as it allows you to control the saws all better.

    Jig saw ~ handy for doing a lot of smaller jobs, but not the straightest.

    circular saw ~ with a metal cutting blade or a composite metal cutting blade will be the straighter line. The grit from the composite blade get into the bearing and can ruin them if you are not careful. A metal blade for cutting sheets is not cheap but hepfully if you do a lot. I use a air blow gun to blow the debre out of the saw with every blade change.

    Tin snips ~ yes you can use these but cheap one will get dull and you need a good strong gripp.

    Large Shear ~ Most metal sideing or roofing has ridges in them so not the best to cut across the grain.

    Hand shear electric or pnumatic~ very handy if you don't do a lot a little tricky cutting across the grain of the sheet . Works better when cutting with the grain.

    Nibbler electric or pnumatic~ Not to bad, but you have all of these sharp metal pieces that easy to get stuck in you.

    Hand nibbler ~ Won't use one any more because a good one cost to much.

    Plasma cutter ~ I wish I had one to try.

    Gas cutting torch ~ Take to much to clean up the edges

    My preferance:
    Usually I use a circular saw with a composite metal cutting blade to cut a the grain, or ridges in the sheets, And a pnuematic hand shear to cut a long the grain. The composite blade usually last for about 3 to 6, 2 foot wide sheets.


    To clean the edges up, use a file, or a deburing tool. It usually takes only one or two light passes of the edge to clean it up. Deburing tools cost any where from a couple of dollars to about $10. But these are not a common tool that you find in most hardware stores.

    Unless you have cut sheet metal before and have developed good techniques for handling it WARE GLOVES, or buy a lot of band aides.

    Also any tool can be hazardous if you are not use to using it. So go slow and be careful.

    Tom
     

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