What is a "Chick Chair" and how do I make one?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by MandM, Apr 22, 2009.

  1. MandM

    MandM New Egg

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    Hi, I'm new to this forum so please forgive a possibly stupid question.

    I have a new chick that appears to be suffering from a slipped tendon. At least the symptoms fit what I have seen others describe as a slipped tendon on this forum. It's not putting any weight on one leg and the hock appears swollen and a bit inflamed. It just hatched earlier today so it must be something that happened while it hatched.

    From other posts for this condition, others has mentioned using a "chick chair" to help this condition but I have not been able to find detailed description of one and have not found any pictures either. Can anyone here tell me how I can make one of these and whether it would be helpful in my case. I am happy to provide any additional details that are necessary (just not sure what details are important and what are not).

    Also, I ran across an article that discussed being able to pop the tendon back into position by squeezing the hock with your thumb and index finger. Has anyone here done this? If so is this something a beginner like me should try or will I risk further injury to the chick? Since the chick has just hatched I am tempted to wait a couple of days before doing anything, but the article stressed the importance of prompt treatment. Any advice on any of this is GREATLY appreciated.

    BTW - the article I am referring to is at:
    http://www.peafowl.org/ARTICLES/1/

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. AngelzFyre

    AngelzFyre Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The most I could find on this condition says it's more than likely a nutritional deficit and to try vitamin/mineral supplementation along with a balanced feed source.

    Below is an excerpt from a website on Avian Nutritional Diseases:

    http://www.myoops.org/twocw/tufts/courses/5/content/215759.htm

    4.4. Angular Limb Deformities
    (Perosis,Slipped tendon disease, Chondrodystrophy, Curled toe paralysis)

    Perosis is a condition of 4-12 week old chickens, turkeys and pen-reared pheasants and quail. It may also be seen in other rapidly growing birds such as ratites, cranes, waterfowl, etc. This condition occurs as the result of lateral slippage of the gastrocnemius (Achilles) tendon at the tibiotarsal (hock) joint due to a generalized disorder of long bone growth plates resulting in impaired linear growth. Normal bone mineralization is maintained. The tendon is also histologically normal, however there is an enlargement of the hock joints and a secondary varus or valgus deformity of the lower leg. The etiology of perosis is complex and associated with a deficiency or imbalance in dietary manganese, choline, biotin, folic acid, niacin, pyridoxine (vitamin B6) and zinc. Curled toe paralysis is a nutritional problem of chicks associated with a deficiency in riboflavin (vitamin B2). Natural occurrence of this condition is rare.



    4.4.1. Clinical signs
    Birds are seldom observed with perosis until there is displacement of the tarsus.
    Unilateral lameness results with hopping on the unaffected leg.
    The condition can be bilateral..
    Affected joints are usually swollen.
    4.4.2. Diagnosis
    Diagnosis is usually based on clinical signs and gross lesions. Analysis of the ration usually reveals that there is a deficiency of manganese, but the other ingredients listed above must also be considered.

    Differential diagnosis should include Mycoplasma infections and reovirus which can produce lesions in the hock joints of chicken and turkeys resembling perosis. Tendon displacement does not usually occur with either of these conditions
     
  3. AngelzFyre

    AngelzFyre Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pell City, Alabama
  4. jenni2142

    jenni2142 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The easiest way for a newbie to put the tendon back is to straighten the leg gently behind it. You don't have to go far and you will feel or see it go back in. It is the gentlest way to pop that tendon back in and it does work.
    A chick chair is used if the chick has been sitting on the hock joint causing it to be red and/or swollen. the easiest one that works for even the tiniest chicks(sebright) is made from a disposable dust mask and an old tissue box, the square kind with the oval opening. Simply cut 2 small holes for the legs and one for poo and lay it like a bowl in the oval opening of the box. cut the box down in size to be the right height for your chick in the natural standing position of chicks. I have more links in my other computer and will look for them. good luck.
     
  5. jenni2142

    jenni2142 Chillin' With My Peeps

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  6. PoultryGirly

    PoultryGirly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Whatever happened to this chick?
     

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