What is a hernia in a goat?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by hollyk, Dec 16, 2008.

  1. hollyk

    hollyk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Canton, Texas
    I have found a registered Saanen goat that I am looking at. She is a really good price and is bred. However, the lady selling her told me that she has a hernia, she thinks. I have searched the internet and all i have found out is that she can't be shown. That doesn't matter to me, what I need to know is will a hernia stop her from milking or kidding normally? I would really appreciate any info you goat folk may have![​IMG]
     
  2. KellyHM

    KellyHM Overrun With Chickens

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    It depends on the type and severity of the hernia. Assuming it's an abdominal hernia, it's possible for intestines to get squeezed in there and to have the blood supply cut off, which can be fatal if not treated surgically. Most goats do fine with a small hernia though. I would have a vet do a pre-purchase exam on her to see how big it is, etc.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2008
  3. Chatychick

    Chatychick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 9, 2007
    Blue Mound, Kansas
    I would ask a vet to see if it can get fixed, or see if its not a problem. Almost sounds like a umbilical hernia possibly to me and some can be bad and some arent. I would definately have it checked before breeding.
     
  4. hollyk

    hollyk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks to both of you. [​IMG] I have a call into my vet. The goat is about and 1 1/2 hr away. How would I go about getting the goat checked and paying the owner? I am new to this aspect. We have never gotten a goat vet checked before. However, after paying for a prego goat who was not prego, I always said I would get a sono the next time. This particular goat is 6 yrs old. Do these hernias occur at birth, during kidding, or anythime?
     
  5. KellyHM

    KellyHM Overrun With Chickens

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    Most hernias occur at birth, when the umbilical sac doesn't close off completely. However, they can occur other times too, from trauma, etc. I would put a call in to a vet close to the goat and have them go look at it for you...just make sure it's not the same vet that person uses...and you can just pay over the phone with your credit card. They could do a quick ultrasound at the same time. Good luck!
     
  6. ksacres

    ksacres At Your Service

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    It depends on what kind of hernia it actually is. Umbilical hernias develope shortly after birth to several months old and remain with the animal for life unless they are surgically fixed.

    I would ask the owner what kind of hernia it is, if this doe has kidded out successfully before, and if the doe is in any apparent discomfort.

    For small hernias, it's really more of an unsightly thing than a real danger.

    I wouldn't personally use a herniated goat for breeding any more than I would use a double teated goat for breeding, but that's me. Hernias can be caused by a genetic weakness, but they can also be caused by injury-but unless you were there, you don't know what caused it, you only know what people tell you.

    As for the vet-depends on the vet. Some will just charge you a "home visit" fee and call it good, some will charge you the call out fee, the gas mileage, time, plus the fee for the "vet check" So, call around and see what vet is willing to do what.

    Seems to me, by the time you fork out the money for a vet, you could have just paid for an already healthy animal...

    Just my two cents.
     
  7. hollyk

    hollyk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I hae been running the numbers in my head and I was thinking the same thing. I really don't need to buy someone else's problems.
    Thanks all for the good info.[​IMG]
     

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