what is an ee? an ee is...

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by hdowden, Nov 18, 2011.

  1. hdowden

    hdowden Overrun With Chickens

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    as i have found it....

    my pet chicken:

    Easter Eggers are not a breed per se, but a variety of chicken that does not conform to any breed standard but lays large to extra large eggs that vary in shade from blue to green to olive to aqua and sometimes even pinkish. Easter Eggers vary widely in color and conformation, and are exceptionally friendly and hardy. Since they are usually quite friendly to children and humans in general, they are a great choice for a family flock. Most hatcheries mistakenly label their Easter Eggers as Ameraucanas or Araucanas (or various misspellings thereof). True Ameraucanas and Araucanas are currently only available through breeders. Eater Eggers do not qualify to be shown, since they do not conform to a breed standard.


    wikipedia:

    An Easter Egger is any chicken that possesses the "blue egg" gene, but doesn't fully meet any breed description as defined in the American Poultry Association (APA) and/or the American Bantam Association (ABA) standards. The name derives from the resemblance of their colorful eggs to Easter eggs. Araucana, Ameraucana, and Easter Eggers are descended from the same founder stock that spread around the world from Chile and the Falklands. Three main founder breeds were involved in the creation of what we today call Araucanas, Ameraucanas, British tailed Araucanas, and the Easter Eggers. These would be the Quechua, the Quetro, and the Colloncas. In about 1976 some Chilean Araucanas were imported to the United States and are still here today unchanged. They appear except for color to be Ameraucanas or British tailed Araucanas. Some Easter Eggers breed true to type and color over fifty percent of the time. Molecular data retrieved from specimens of known provenance in the Falklands, United Kingdom, Shetland Isles, and Canada proved to be closely related. Consequently, the Ameraucana is probably closer genetically to the South American founders than the North American Araucana. None of these, Araucana, Ameraucana, or British tailed Araucanas were actually a breed in South America.

    Often confused with the rare, pure breeds of Araucana and the not so rare Ameraucana, the majority of chickens in laying flocks that lay blue or green eggs are Easter Eggers.[1] Even if a bird meets an APA or ABA Standard of Perfection breed description, but doesn't meet a variety description, or breed true at least fifty percent of the time, it is technically considered an Easter Egger. These chickens commonly exhibit muffs and beards similar to the Ameraucana. Easter Eggers come in many colors and most are duckwing at the E locus.
     
  2. Mahonri

    Mahonri Urban Desert Chicken Enthusiast Premium Member

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    It's all clear as mud now.....

    ... and I've seen my share of EEs that lay tan and brown., even with pea combs, muffs and bears.
     
  3. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Quote:My pet chicken is always good for a laugh, so are the bantam EE's going to lay a large to extra large eggs? They also left out Brown and White in the egg colors.

    Chris
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2011
  4. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Quote:So very true,
    I have a EE that is solid black, black legs, single comb, clean faced and lays a very light blue egg, then I also have a white ee that passes as a Ameraucana right down to the slate shanks and the bottom of the feet being pink but she lays a white egg.

    Chris
     
  5. Little One

    Little One Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think pictures would help. Especially for those of us who didnt know better and thought we could get Ameraucana chicks from a hatchery or feed store. Also, I saw EEs at our last county fair... labeled as ameraucanas?!
     
  6. Pele

    Pele Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] I give them an A for effort. It's the best explanation I've ever seen a hatchery give. Of course, that's like trying to hand out a blue ribbon among a group of people who brought ducks to a chicken show.....
     
  7. anderson8505

    anderson8505 Peace, Love & Happy Chickens

    The first post of this thread is a good reference:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=128806

    I just happened to look it up because I bought an EE from a feed store but they were calling them "Ameraucanas." I knew it wasn't probable from a hatchery, I just needed a chick as a buddy for my First Chick who turned out to be the Only Chick.... [​IMG]
     
  8. hdowden

    hdowden Overrun With Chickens

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    feathersite:

    ~ The American Poultry Association recognizes a bird called the Ameraucana, which lays colored eggs and has muffs and a beard, not ear tufts, and comes in standardized color varieties. The Ameraucana also comes in a bantam form.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    ~ Most of the so-called Araucanas in the US are mixes that carry some of the original genes and lay variously colored eggs: blue, green, or pinkish. These birds are sometimes (and more honestly) sold as Easter Egger chickens. They come in white and many other colors.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  9. hdowden

    hdowden Overrun With Chickens

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    whats another difference besides their coloration?
     
  10. hdowden

    hdowden Overrun With Chickens

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    heres another ~

    The Ameraucana Breeders Club defines an Easter Egg chicken or Easter Egger as any chicken that possesses the blue egg gene, but doesn’t fully meet any breed descriptions as defined in the APA and/or ABA standards. Further, even if a bird meets an Ameraucana standard breed description, but doesn’t meet a variety description or breed true at least 50% of the time it is considered an Easter Egg chicken.

    heres the colors that are recognized by the American Bantam Association and by the American Poultry Association ~

    Eight varieties have been recognized by both organizations since 1984. They are: Black, Blue, Blue wheaten, Brown red, Buff, Silver, Wheaten, and White. These same eight specific color patterns are recognized in both large fowl and bantams (miniatures).
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2011

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