What is normal for duck eggs?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by LivinOnLove, Jan 9, 2014.

  1. LivinOnLove

    LivinOnLove Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 16, 2013
    Wisconsin
    We've been getting eggs for about a month now. We're eating them and all was fine. Now the last two times that I've eaten them, I've gotten very sick!

    What we're doing:
    When they are cracked from being frozen, we either throw them in the garden or give them to the outside cats.
    My hubby read online that to wash them that the water should be warmer than the egg otherwise it creates a vacuum - so we're washing them in warm water and no soap, is that the correct way?
    I've noticed that most of the yolks are more sticky/thick than chicken egg yolks and the whites are more slimy (they stretch and don't all come out of the shell.
    Is there something wrong with our eggs?

    I was eating them this whole month, and just recently have gotten sick twice. I thought it was just a intestinal bug until it happened the second time. My boys and husband have both also eaten them; none of them have gotten sick. Hhmm?

    Ruthann
     
  2. StruckBy

    StruckBy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 2, 2012
    Marcola, OR
    Sounds like your eggs are fine. Duck eggs are quite a bit richer than chicken eggs...the yolks have more fat (which is why they make such divine custards and quiches). The whites should stay more translucent than chicken eggs when cooked. They almost look like white stained glass to me.

    I have known a couple people who seemed to have a hard time digesting duck eggs...it was almost like a lactose intolerance for them. I would try eating one well cooked (as opposed to runny yolk) & see if it still bothers you.

    As far as washing the eggs, the water temp doesn't matter. If you wash them, be sure you are putting them straight in the fridge. I don't usually bother...just leave them in a metal basket on the kitchen counter. If they are really dirty, I'll give them a quick wash (sometimes with soap, sometimes not) & a quick dry with a paper towel right before I use them.
     
  3. LivinOnLove

    LivinOnLove Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 16, 2013
    Wisconsin
    Thought I'd update and what I found out about me and our eggs. My boys and hubby can eat our duck eggs, but I get violently sick when I eat them. I did some research and found out that I am allergic to them. There are people that can eat chicken eggs but not duck eggs, and vice versa. Some people are allergic/intolerant of the proteins, some to the fat content, and some to the sulfur content. I am allergic to sulfa drugs, and duck eggs have a higher content of sulfa. Broccoli and cauliflower also have a high sulfur content, and I also get sick with them. I also have a slight reaction to wines. I researched reaction to sulfa/sulfur and it is exactly what I had: body heating up very hot, pounding headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea. The positive: I have my answer. Negative: now we have lots of duck eggs, and what to do with them all?!
     
  4. HollyDuckFarmer

    HollyDuckFarmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 30, 2012
    LP Michigan
    I hard boil my extras and give to my dogs or donate to others for dogs.
     
  5. StruckBy

    StruckBy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Marcola, OR
    Sell them or trade them. I trade mine for wild mushrooms, fresh caught fish, homemade bread, etc with people at work. If you have an Asian community, they will sell like you wouldn't believe (the Asian market we used to shop at in Reno sold them for $4 EACH (not per dozen) so if I brought a few dozen in I could sell them in a heartbeat for $6 a dozen
     

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