What is Purina’s connection to backyard flocks?

Discussion in 'Nutrition - Sponsored by Purina Poultry' started by Monica S, Mar 6, 2017.

  1. Monica S

    Monica S BYC Content and Advertising Specialist

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    A: When it comes to poultry, backyard chickens are our passion. We raise chickens much like you – and have fallen in love with our hens’ farm fresh eggs, unique personalities and enjoyable antics.

    Our flock of chickens calls the Purina Animal Nutrition Center home, where they live in 12 coops. Today, we have Plymouth Barred Rock and Buff Orpington hens – along with a few other fun breeds to spice things up. We worked with a coop designer to specially create each of our 12 coops. Each house can hold up to15 full-size hens. We designed these coops to replicate how folks like you are raising poultry at home today.

    This set-up helps us evaluate nutrition’s role in each stage of the chicken journey, which includes young chick development, pullet growth, egg quality, shell strength, feed palatability and bird health.

    Our team of chicken keepers is passionate about backyard chickens and understands it is more than just feeding our birds; we are feeding our families.

    Here are a few photos of our backyard flocks on our farm in Missouri:

    We recently built 12 coops at the Purina Animal Nutrition Center. Having these coops right in our backyard allows us to enjoy raising chickens while knowing exactly what to include in our feed recipes. Before the bag of feed arrives at your local retailer, we’ve already made sure our flock enjoys the formula that keeps them healthy and helps hens produce nutritious eggs!

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    Meet our flock care team! These caregivers work together each day to keep our 12 coops of Barred Rocks and Buff Orpingtons happy and healthy. On any given day, you can find them feeding, watering, collecting eggs and maintaining data.

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    Just like you, we love collecting wholesome, farm fresh eggs each day. We designed our coops so we could have easy access to the nesting boxes and allow the hens to lay peacefully.

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    Our flock consists of Barred Rocks and Buff Orpingtons, two popular backyard breeds that are known for being excellent layers. Shown below is one of our team members enjoying their daily antics while filling the feeders!

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  2. barred2rock

    barred2rock Chillin' With My Peeps

    Very cool! Thanks to this post I might even try Purina feed :p
    Thanks for sharing!
     
  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    I visited your facility back in early February. Cool setups. Would like to see free-range variant on that like I use with personal flock. I am having all sorts of fun watching how free-range birds have different feed stuff preferences relative to the confined birds. Also temperature impacts preferences.
     
  4. Purina

    Purina Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You're welcome, thanks for stopping by our forum! You might also enjoy our Purina Poultry Facebook page and Pinterest profile. There are many great resources we share, as well as celebrating the fun and joy of raising backyard chickens.

    You can find a retailer near you that would carry Purina's complete feeds by using our handy locator. Find it here!
     
  5. Purina

    Purina Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for visiting our farm, centrarchid! Great feedback--we will let our team know about your interest in free-ranging research. How do you prefer to free-range your flock?
     
  6. barred2rock

    barred2rock Chillin' With My Peeps


    Thank you! I already have a 10 lb bag of a different brand on hand, but I'll be switching to Purina next time I run into town (60 miles away).
     
  7. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    I employ two free-range configurations. First has flocks confined over area that supports herbacious vegetation that usually has depleted animal forage component but at least some plant forage thus requiring complete diet formulation. Second has flocks able to define limits of foraging area themselves where animal forage base is usually depressed but not depleted and plant forage is not limiting. The second configuration has ranging habits fluctuating as a function of forage quantity and quality where I can also impact radius foraged by use of supplemental / incomplete foods such as corn or some other grain that provides mostly energy.
     

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