What is the difference between fryers and roasters?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by crazyfarmmom27, Feb 21, 2009.

  1. crazyfarmmom27

    crazyfarmmom27 Out Of The Brooder

    11
    0
    22
    Feb 9, 2009
    WNY-Southerntier
    While I'm not new to farming, I am new to chickens and to be honest I didn't know a thing about them before I found this wonderful website! I practically live on here now! But I have been unable to find the answer to the above question on this site yet. Can anyone help, please? Thank you!
     
  2. minifarmer

    minifarmer Out Of The Brooder

    52
    0
    29
    Jun 6, 2008
    warren county, ohio
    Welcome! This site is addictive!! A fryer, generally, is in the 3 to 5 pound range. A roaster is larger (thus older) more in the 6-8 pound range. Fryers usually, though not always cook quicker and can be more tender. Roasters ( to me ) have more flavor as they have ranged longer in the field. Now if you let them get really big ( 12 to 16 pounds) I call them 'churkeys!" Hope this helps! Karla
     
  3. crazyfarmmom27

    crazyfarmmom27 Out Of The Brooder

    11
    0
    22
    Feb 9, 2009
    WNY-Southerntier
    Thank you, Karla! Can both male and females be fryers/roasters? I also read that as far as meat birds are concerned cornish x's are the way to go but I'm nervous about hybrids. Is there any cause for my concern?
    Thank you!
     
  4. Carolina Chicken Man

    Carolina Chicken Man Chillin' With My Peeps

    229
    3
    134
    Mar 29, 2008
    Raleigh, NC
    Cornish X are what the commercial chicken operations use. It's what you buy in the grocery store.

    They are the best as far as growth rate.

    There are other types you can get that many on this site think are better. They don't grow as fast, but have advantages as far as pasture raising.

    I think many like the "Freedom Rangers" or something along that line.

    For the most part, any bird raised specifically for meat is going to be a hybrid.

    And yes, for the meat birds, you generally use both. Cornish X are going to be ready to slaughter before they are sexually mature anyway. A fryer is around 6 weeks old, and a broiler a couple weeks older.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2009
  5. Hens_And_Chicks

    Hens_And_Chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    551
    0
    139
    Feb 23, 2009
    Ohio
    If you go to a hatchery's website and look at their links for meat chickens, generally all they have available is a commercial Cornish Rock Cross - a fast growing crossbred specifically for meat production - they are generally a large breasted chicken and they grow very quickly - 6-8 weeks max - they are known to have leg problems and the fast growth rate can cause heart attack deaths.

    A lot of heavy breed chickens are dual purpose meaning they are egg layers and good meat chickens but have a much slower maturity rate.

    On the Cornish Rock crosses, the females are usually a bit cheaper and take about a week longer to reach the same weight as males.

    Hope that helps (from another Karla with a "K" in Wayne Co Ohio:))
     
  6. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    24,442
    49
    371
    May 7, 2007
    Forks, Virginia
    When you go to the grocery store take a look in the meat case.

    Chickens packaged as 'fryers' have a thin breast.

    Roasters are big and thick breasted.

    A roaster is the product of thebroiler industry, bred to grow fast and big with a wide full chest on wide spaced legs.

    The fryers are usually leghorns or other white chickens (usually cockerals) that grow out thinner, slower and sometimes a bit longer breast and rib cage.

    Roaster- This cornish is from CAckle hatchery.
    [​IMG]

    Fryer - This leghorn rooster belongs to Ed (threeboyschicks). It was the only photo I could find with a clear chest.
    [​IMG]


    See the diference?
     
  7. Steve

    Steve Ye Olde Henhouse Builder

    And this is a 10 lb. "Churkey"

    [​IMG]
     
  8. minifarmer

    minifarmer Out Of The Brooder

    52
    0
    29
    Jun 6, 2008
    warren county, ohio
    I love your Churkey!! I'm to the point where I can't even process them until I'll get an 8-12# carcass! Plus, they're kinda' cute at that size! karla
     
  9. jaku

    jaku Chillin' With My Peeps

    Cornish X's are great. Take the complaints about them and warnings of potential problems with a grain of salt. The problems are easily avoidable, and I would think one would be disappointed with the meat yield from a different breed.
     
  10. ncchixlady

    ncchixlady Out Of The Brooder

    34
    0
    22
    Mar 14, 2009
    North Carolina
    Can I add a question to this??? If you use a Cornish, can you also fry them, boil for chicken pie, etc or is another type of bird better for that? I guess what I'm asking is are they multipurpose as far as recipes go or typically a leave whole and roast bird? Thanks so much.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by