What is the latest in the year you can start raising chicks?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Chocobo, Sep 16, 2011.

  1. Chocobo

    Chocobo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 27, 2011
    The most popular time of year to raise chicks seems to be in the spring but as long as you keep them inside until they feather out it seems like many people continue to hatch throughout the summer.
    What I was wondering is at what point in the year should you NOT start raising chicks?
    I realize that this will change rather dramatically from region to region but I thought that perhaps there was a general rule like planting dates for vegetables. "Don't hatch chicks after X number of days before first frost" or something like that.
    I am in Texas if that helps and there isn't a rule of thumb.
     
  2. Hot2Pot

    Hot2Pot Fox Hollow Rabbitry

    Feb 1, 2010
    West TN
    I never stop hatching chicks unless I am going on vacation. Last year I kept them in my tub and this year I built an insulated room in the barn.
     
  3. Gypsy07

    Gypsy07 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Glasgow, Scotland
    If you want them to grow to their full potential, you're best to hatch in the early spring. Any other time of year, they never really end up quite as big as the spring ones. But apart from that, you can hatch year round. I've hatched chicks in the middle of winter and the middle of summer. Some people like to set them in early December for a New Year's Day hatch...
     
  4. Chocobo

    Chocobo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:When you say they won't grow to their full potential are you referring to meat birds or ANY type of chicken. These would just be for eggs.
     
  5. ourlittleflock

    ourlittleflock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Can you please explain "If you want them to grow to their full potential, you're best to hatch in the early spring"? why is this? Thanks still learning. [​IMG]
     
  6. Gypsy07

    Gypsy07 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well... I don't know the exact reasons for the different growth, but it's definitely true. Of all chickens, not just meat ones. I have been hatching out eggs from one pair of birds for well over a year now, and the ones which have ended up the biggest were the ones I hatched out in late January. In comparison with those ones, the others look distinctly scrawny! It's a well accepted thing among breeders, not something I'm making up here, honest! Show breeders with large birds usually prefer to hatch in the spring to make sure the birds reach their full potential. But if you're just breeding for eggs and mostly as a hobby, it won't matter at all.

    Hopefully someone can explain the reasons for the growth thing, cause I'd like to know too!
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2011
  7. Illia

    Illia Crazy for Colors

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    December 31, - At 11:59 PM. [​IMG]
     
  8. Hot2Pot

    Hot2Pot Fox Hollow Rabbitry

    Feb 1, 2010
    West TN
    I am sure there are a lot of factors. Consider increasing day length, available insects for protein, greens sprouting up all would be factors. Plus it is the "natural" time for birds to hatch chicks.
     
  9. BarefootMom

    BarefootMom Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 20, 2010
    Half Way, Missouri
    I don't think it matters, as long as you provide them with enough heat, food, and water. Keep them in the brooder until fully feathered if possible.
     
  10. jmtcmkb

    jmtcmkb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Whew because I have 5 coming in two weeks and its going to be very cold here soon......I was so excited and didnt want to wait until Spring! It is my understanding after they are feathered, I can move them outside and keep a heat lamp out with them for a few weeks at night and they should adjust after that.

    How can you tell when they are fully feathered?
     

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