What is the MOST broody breed of Quail?

Discussion in 'Quail' started by chickenwhisperer123, Aug 7, 2009.

  1. chickenwhisperer123

    chickenwhisperer123 Whispers Loudly

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    I want to get some Quail, but want them to self-produce, because my parents wont let me get an incubator.

    I think I like Button Quail... How broody are they? Will they sit and hatch?

    Can the broody and the babies stay with the little flock (of 6) other Quail, or is seperation necissary?
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2009
  2. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

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    If you're going to try to be self sufficiant like that with quail you're going to get a lot of disapointment. Because even button quails don't always brood. My reccomendation to you though, is to buy from someone who has broody buttonquails (buy specifically eggs or chicks or birds from those brooding parents). Separation is sometimes necc. Are you SURE your parents wont consider a used local for sale incubator or something? Because believe me, you're going to have better luck that way.... atleast in the long run. Some broody buttonquails sit for 14 days then STOP....so you'll need an incubator to finnish the hatch.
     
  3. chickenwhisperer123

    chickenwhisperer123 Whispers Loudly

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    Quote:Its not a dissapointment, I was just wondering. [​IMG]

    My parents "WILL NOT LET ME HAVE AN INCUBATOR, because im going to college in 3 years...." lol

    I was just wondering about broody quail, but I do have plenty of silkies to do the job!! [​IMG]

    Would silkies do okay with that small of hatchlings?
     
  4. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

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    Quote:Its not a dissapointment, I was just wondering. [​IMG]

    My parents "WILL NOT LET ME HAVE AN INCUBATOR, because im going to college in 3 years...." lol

    I was just wondering about broody quail, but I do have plenty of silkies to do the job!! [​IMG]

    Would silkies do okay with that small of hatchlings?

    Well why didnt you mention silkies to begin with! [​IMG] hehe! Yes you can use silkies pick your best broodie girl (or broodie girls) but you need to watch like a hawk from day 15 on if you can because once those babies hatch you HAVE to take them. They wll be way too small for her to brood them after she hatches them. If she steps on them she can crush them, if she pecks at them she can kill them..etc you get the picture. Not to mention it's been prooven that if they aren't with their natural broodie parent they can actually run away from big mama chicken lol. Which you don't want ofcourse. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2009
  5. chickenwhisperer123

    chickenwhisperer123 Whispers Loudly

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    Quote:Okay, I know it depends on each quail, but about how many eggs could I expect from a button? And how old do they need to be before they mature (males and females)

    And yes, I really dont want them to run away! [​IMG]
     
  6. quailbrain

    quailbrain Songster

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    A female button can lay at 6-10 weeks old. She will be broody given the right enviroment but can lay an egg everyday of the year too, given that type of an enviroment. I don't think I'd try them under a chicken but Coturnix or other larger quail could be under a chicken probably.
     
  7. Akane

    Akane Crowing

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    Even in a perfect environment quail usually don't go broody often. You won't get many babies that way. A bantam hen can easily hatch quail though and better than most incubators. You just have to pen them up or be sure to take the chicks away right after they hatch.

    So long as they have enough light and protein button quail will lay nearly every day without fail. The females will burn themselves out and if not given a good diet possibly even die quite early before they stop laying. It's good to give them a break by keeping them fairly dark for awhile every now and then if they don't take a break naturally. Other species of quail tend to be a bit more seasonal and more likely to stop laying in the winter.
     
  8. citalk2much

    citalk2much Twilight Blessings Farm

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    I have had great luck with broody buttons. There are several folks on here that have had good luck with broody buttons. I would get my stock from one of us. Also I would back up what what Monarc said about the silkie.
     

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