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What is the shelf-life of Purina products?

Discussion in 'Nutrition - Sponsored by Purina Poultry' started by casportpony, Nov 11, 2014.

  1. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    @DrMikelleRoeder , assume a bag is stored in a cool, dry place, what is the shelf-life of the various Purina crumbles and pellets?

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2014
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Most feed companies use the same preservatives, usually ethoxyquin. Ground seeds lose nutrients quickly. It's difficult to say how long the added vitamins, both water and fat soluble as well as added amino acids remain nutritious. Responsible companies don't keep feed more than 6 months. I don't feed anything over 3 months.
    I sending some feed to Land o Lakes to be analyzed this week.
     
  3. DrMikelleRoeder

    DrMikelleRoeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If ethoxyquin is used, it must be listed in the ingredient listing. In fact, all preservatives must be listed, and new labeling regulations stipulate that preservatives must be identified as such [e.g., propionic acid (a preservative)]. Many vitamins are stabilized so that, under good storage conditions, they will be viable for a long time. Minerals are generally quite stable. Fats, if not stabilized with either chemical or natural antioxidants, will oxidize under poor storage conditions. It is always wise to take feed home from the feed store immediately (as in don't drive around all day with it lying in the sun in the bed of the pick-up) and store it in a cool, dry area, up off the ground (especially if that ground is concrete), and away from windows where the sun may shine in on it. The better care the feed is given, the longer it retains its nutritional integrity.
     
  4. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Thanks for that response Dr.. So both water and fat soluble vitamins are stabilized? If that's the case, as the OP asked, what would the shelf life of those vitamins be in ideal storage conditions. Do you analyze feed that is older than freshly manufactured?
     
  5. DrMikelleRoeder

    DrMikelleRoeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you look at an ingredient tag that is using chemical terms to describe the vitamins (as opposed to simply saying, for instance, Vitamin A supplement), you will often see words like "acetate", "hydrochloride", "bisulfite", etc., which are all stabilized forms, and these apply to both water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins. I have personally seen analyses where vitamins were still active in nutritionally adequate concentrations after a year of ideal storage, but I certainly would not go so far as to say that we should be feeding anything that is a year old. But if properly stored, feeds will retain their nutritional integrity much longer than most people realize. Conversely, many people do not realize how destructive poor storage can be -- I have seen some pretty questionable feed storage arrangements over the course of my career. People always want someone to put hard numbers to shelf-life, but in reality, it is a range at best that depends on many factors -- storage conditions, physical form (meals, for instance, have much more surface area and therefore exposure to oxygen, moisture, etc., than pellets, so they will not last as long), mineral content (products with very high mineral contents, like combined vitamin and mineral supplements can potentially result in shorter shelf-life of the vitamins, depending on the forms used), fat and moisture content (high-fat and/or high-moisture products will generally have shorter shelf-lives), etc. But the primary determinant is really how that feed is treated once it has been manufactured. I hope that helps explain this topic.
     
  6. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Very helpful, thanks.
    And that storage is out of the hands of the manufacturer.
    Hot and humid here in the summer and I only have so much space for cool dry storage, but not really a problem since I go through most of my orders in a month.
     
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    From another thread:
    -Kathy
     

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