What is this all about?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Mobilelyn, Jul 31, 2014.

  1. Mobilelyn

    Mobilelyn Chirping

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    I am slightly suspicious this is the wrong forum but if I will let anyone ekes with experience decide.

    I have an Old English Bantam that is 15 weeks. Yesterday I say him crowing (cute!). Today he was off hiding behind the water bin alone, squatting & straining: I thought for sure He was a She & there was an egg coming out but after a few minutes of this he/she? Went about her business as if nothing happened: no poop, no egg. I felt around his underside a bit & don't know what I should be feeling to check of there is an egg: I don't *think* I felt anything but I've never felt up a bird before so I am not sure.

    Could he be constipated'?
    Could she be doing the love dance?

    Do they look the same?

    Any ideas on how to proceed?

    Thanks in advance: I am not sure whether to panic (if he's ill) or dance if he's a she!
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2014
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Crowing

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  3. Mobilelyn

    Mobilelyn Chirping

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    Thank you so much for the great reply!

    Here are the pics I just snapped of my bird "Lavendar". My guess is Roo, but I am a complete noob at this.

    In the meantime, there was a pretty normal poop, maybe a little grayer than normal, with a moment of puffing but nothing as dramatic as the display this morning.

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  4. chooks4life

    chooks4life Crowing

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    Ah, thanks. He's definitely a male. Must be constipated then, definitely won't be eggbound. ;)

    These pictures may help, or may be clear as mud, but I've drawn around the identifying feathers. If you look closely at them you will see they have a different structure to a hen or juvenile female or male.

    The ones on his wings that look darker aren't actually darker, the pigment remains the same as it was before, but the physical structure of the feathers has changed so they are not only differently shaped, but have different surfaces and reflect light differently.

    The only time hens get these sorts of feathers is when they have hormonal imbalances so severe that they're generally infertile. However, hens get a less fringed but also shinier sort of neck feathering around puberty too, mostly, though some breeds of hens and even males gain no shiny feathering (hen feathered breeds). Probably better described as 'juvenile feathered breeds' since normal adult hens also gain some shiny neck feathers.

    Anyway, hope this helps. With the feathers I've outlined, if you spot even one on a young bird, it will tell you its gender. But I am guessing soon enough, with some more experience, you will be able to tell gender by comb and wattle development before the male type feathering even comes through, since comb and wattles show quicker. Behavior isn't reliable, there is no magical boundary between male and female behavior, so both genders can exhibit behaviors thought of as belonging to the opposite sex. Comb, wattle and feather development is generally the best indicator unless it's an autosexing breed.

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  5. chooks4life

    chooks4life Crowing

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    Also, some of his tail feathers are very male type, way too long to be a hen's and curled like a typical males'.

    Best wishes.
     
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  6. Mobilelyn

    Mobilelyn Chirping

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    I can't say thank you enough for your clear & detailed reply. I *think* out of my 3 OEGB, I have 1 hen; her feathers look different but I will save that for the other forum.

    Should I use molasses for constipation or wait it out to see if it rectifies itself. He did poop earlier so he may be in the clear!
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Free Ranging

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    A probiotic in his water such as this one may help with his constipation problem--dosage is 1/4 tsp per gallon of water 3 days a week.

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  8. Mobilelyn

    Mobilelyn Chirping

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    So the whole flock can have it?
     
  9. chooks4life

    chooks4life Crowing

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    You're welcome, wish I had better examples of feathering, but if you get the idea that will work too.

    I've not used molasses for constipation, never had an issue with it so far. I avoid molasses with mine because if it's not 'blackstrap' then it's had white/refined sugar added back to it; my chooks hated that and it makes sense as white sugar directly feeds numerous health issues including parasites, cancers, 'bad' bacteria, etc. Molasses is also a heating food so best not given during summer.

    Constipation is usually due to one of a few things, i.e. parasites, dehydration, excessive fiber in the diet possibly without enough sharp large grits, or illness. If their diet has changed recently that can also do it. If only one bird shows symptoms maybe it's a once-off but if more show symptoms it would be worth treating, better safe than sorry.

    I've never used probiotic formulas for them but it should be safe to give it to all of them. I haven't found most storebought probiotics are any better than plain yoghurt is, really, though I was buying for other animals and humans, in those cases. I've not had a need for them so have no experience with proprietary formulas.

    If more than one bird shows symptoms then probably all of them should have it since you can then assume it's likely to be an issue all have to varying degrees.

    Best wishes.
     
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