What is this? Help Please!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Maiadab, Feb 5, 2013.

  1. Maiadab

    Maiadab Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 5, 2013
    South Central Texas
    We just bought our very first hens 9-days ago. They are between 10 and 19 weeks of age. Everything has been going smoothly. They transitioned well and over the last day or two will come up to me when I go outside. We bought these hens for egg laying only.

    So far all the chickens are active and eating and drinking. I haven't noticed any problems except yesterday one of the hens had a wound I think by her nostrils.

    Today I noticed two chickens with bubbly/foaming eyes.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    We have a total of 7 hens. We bought from a breeder who was recommended to me and also had good reviews online.

    Thanks for your help.
     
  2. SD Bird Lady

    SD Bird Lady Chillin' With My Peeps

    It will need to be treated with antibiotics but I can't remeber what it is called. Someone with more experience should post soon. In the mean time my post will bump you back up to the top.
     
  3. hrhta812

    hrhta812 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Found lots of comments with this same symptom - from Ask the Vet site...
    Although there are many possible causes of eye conditions, one, in particular, causes the frothy appearance you've described, and is quite common:
    Chronic respiratory disease.
    This disease is caused by a bacteria called Mycoplasma, and is highly contagious, often affecting all the members of a flock. You've certainly done the right thing in isolating her, and disinfecting the feeders and waters. This organism is spread by contact with infected individuals, inhaled infectious dust, and can be spread from breeders through hatching eggs. Shoes and tools must also be disinfected after being close to her.
    Unfortunately, although Tylan (tylosin) or Gallimycin (erythromycin) may help infected birds survive, they will be life-long carriers, and able to infect others.
    There are other similar disease that should be considered including infectious coryza, cholera, infectious bronchitis and Newcastle disease.


     
  4. Maiadab

    Maiadab Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 5, 2013
    South Central Texas
    So what do we do? We don't have a lot of money to spend on vet bills and medicines. Is the best thing to do is to get rid of all 7 chickens then start over? The problem with that is the kids and I saved up for several months to be able to buy pullets and get our coop built and ready to go. After only having these hens for 9 days and they are already sick makes me feel like we were cheated and to just give up. [​IMG]
    This just has me sick. What I've read if it is mycoplasma then the whole coop is infected and it never goes away - once infected always infected.

    Very discouraged, disappointed, and sad new chicken owner.
     
  5. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    I would put them all on antibiotics, like Tylan. That's all a vet would do. You can probably get it at Tractor Supply, or from an online poultry supply. Chickens can be very sad, and very rewarding. My whole flock has a virus that can't be treated. I just have to take certain measures if I hatch eggs . I would not get rid of them, just give them antibiotics, and do some research and see how other people deal with it. I would hate to see you and the kids get rid of hens because they have a snotty nose and runny eyes. One step at a time. Antibiotics first.
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2013
  6. Maiadab

    Maiadab Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 5, 2013
    South Central Texas
    This is what Tractor Supply sells. Is this the correct stuff?
    Tylan 50, 100 mL, Elanco Cattle Treatment


    Thank you for your help everyone!!!!!
     
  7. Maiadab

    Maiadab Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 5, 2013
    South Central Texas
    Shamelessly bumping.
     
  8. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Jacksonville, Florida
    Yes, that is the correct stuff.
    Dosage is 1/4cc injected into the breast muscle just under the skin once a day for 3 days. Alternate breasts and dont inject into the same spot.
    You can give it orally if you wish; 1/4cc given orally once a day for 5-7 days, no more than 7 days.
     
  9. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    Don't be afraid to do this. Tractor supply may have the needles and syringes there. It's a good way to get your feet wet in the world of chickens. Many of us have been there. Oral is good, but I like injections better if I can. Some chickens may not drink enough water when they're sick.
     
  10. tdgill

    tdgill Chillin' With My Peeps

    Question: If you are giving an antibiotic orally, can you just put the 1/4 cc on a bit of bread (which my chickens would gobble right down!) I have in the past given liquid meds by just putting a drop at a time on the top and side of the beak, by the time it rolls down to where the beak meets the bottom, the hen moves her beak and takes it in.....

    I am a sissy around needles....but all the more power to you if you can do it.

    Don't be discouraged. I think these issues are quite common, more than we think. And I think your birds will recover and you will go on to have lots of yummy eggs. :)

    also: How is their environment? Lots of fresh air in the coop? Dry bedding? no ammonia smell low in the coop? Do any of the hens roost low near the litter?
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2013

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